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PRESIDENT BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMA


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It's more than that. Obama did not run on his race.

But his election is the closest thing America can have to redemption for our original sin. Obama's race didn't keep us from electing him. That shouldn't be a big deal, but it is. The world will look at us with respect and admiration and wonder again, beginning right now.

This will be remembered forever as the moment when we Americans turned a big page in our history. I couldn't be happier.

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Guest Voice of Reason
PRESIDENT BARACK HUSSEIN OBAMA!!!!

Time to BURY the DARK, SICK Bush Years.........and the Clintons.......and that airhead Reagan.

YES!!!

Hey, LoonyTunes, no reason to get yourself all worked up, Obama ain't doin nutin for you. Except maybe raise your taxes.

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It's more than that. Obama did not run on his race.

But his election is the closest thing America can have to redemption for our original sin. Obama's race didn't keep us from electing him. That shouldn't be a big deal, but it is. The world will look at us with respect and admiration and wonder again, beginning right now.

This will be remembered forever as the moment when we Americans turned a big page in our history. I couldn't be happier.

Our original sin? Really.

Why will everyone go gaga over us ? All of a sudden we represent something different than what we have always been.

And will continue to be, albeit with a different spin and a shiny new coat of paint of course.

Wax on - wax off Miyagi san.

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It's more than that. Obama did not run on his race.

But his election is the closest thing America can have to redemption for our original sin. Obama's race didn't keep us from electing him. That shouldn't be a big deal, but it is. The world will look at us with respect and admiration and wonder again, beginning right now.

This will be remembered forever as the moment when we Americans turned a big page in our history. I couldn't be happier.

Again- You're kidding- right?

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Guest 2smart4u
It's more than that. Obama did not run on his race.

But his election is the closest thing America can have to redemption for our original sin. Obama's race didn't keep us from electing him. That shouldn't be a big deal, but it is. The world will look at us with respect and admiration and wonder again, beginning right now.

This will be remembered forever as the moment when we Americans turned a big page in our history. I couldn't be happier.

Sounds like Paul has found religion, he experienced an epiphany. See you in chuch on Sunday.

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Sounds like Paul has found religion, he experienced an epiphany. See you in chuch on Sunday.

Your problem is that you're either too stupid or too stubborn to understand the point. It's really a very good one.

The USA was founded with a Constitution that allowed slavery. It was morally wrong, like Adam and Eve's sin was said to be wrong.

Every generation since has been paying for this sin. See the similarity?

Obama's election proved that the United States was willing to elect a black person to the highest office in the land. We didn't have to elect him, but we did anyway. We can't undo the past, so that's the closest thing to redemption we can have.

You don't even have to go to church to get that, and you don't have to believe that the Adam and Eve myth really happened. All you have to understand is what the story represents. Ask your pastor. Let us know whether he gets it.

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Sounds like Paul has found religion, he experienced an epiphany. See you in chuch on Sunday.

I'm sorry that you choose to mock what you don't understand. I've always been religious. What you don't seem to understand is that religion is about what is real, not about stories that are not real. It's about what binds us all together, not what tears us apart.

The idea of original sin has done more harm than good. It has led people to take a dim view of themselves but maybe more important, it has led people to take a dim view of others. Somehow we usually manage to apply supposedly universal moral truths to everyone but ourselves.

On the other hand, the value of an idea like this is that it points to those occasions when an evil act affects many people for generations. Our country's treatment of black people is an example of that. The United States is still paying the price of slavery, economically and culturally. You can refuse to see it if you want to, but you do yourself no credit parading your ignorance around as though it was something to be proud of.

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Guest Extinguisher
Sounds like Paul has found religion, he experienced an epiphany. See you in chuch on Sunday.

No, Paul did not overstate this historical moment. After 300 years of slavery based on race, nearly a century of legal racial segregation after slavery ended, and only 42 years after the principle of one person/one vote was enforced by the Supreme Court, this country will have an African-American president. The incredible symbolism of this change occurred when Barack Obama entered the White House with George Bush earlier this week -- he was entering into a house that was literally built by Black labor (both slaves and hired workers).

It's also a powerful commentary on democracy in America. What other democratic country has elected a candidate to their highest office from a minority racial group in that country? None of the European democracies or Canada or Australia. (The South African president is a member of the majority in that country.)

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Guest 2smart4u
I'm sorry that you choose to mock what you don't understand. I've always been religious. What you don't seem to understand is that religion is about what is real, not about stories that are not real. It's about what binds us all together, not what tears us apart.

The idea of original sin has done more harm than good. It has led people to take a dim view of themselves but maybe more important, it has led people to take a dim view of others. Somehow we usually manage to apply supposedly universal moral truths to everyone but ourselves.

On the other hand, the value of an idea like this is that it points to those occasions when an evil act affects many people for generations. Our country's treatment of black people is an example of that. The United States is still paying the price of slavery, economically and culturally. You can refuse to see it if you want to, but you do yourself no credit parading your ignorance around as though it was something to be proud of.

One word sums up your entire post; Gobbledygook.

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It is written here that, “But his election is the closest thing America can have to redemption for our original sin.” I respect the comment but I will refrain from a response and only note that as an American I personally am not guilty of “our” alleged original sin; I did not commit this grave offense, and consequently, do not need redemption. Nonetheless, to clarify the term I cite Wikipedia, “Original sin is, according to a doctrine in Christian theology, humanity's state of sin resulting from the Fall of Man.” “Roman Catholic teaching regards original sin as the general condition of sinfulness (lack of holiness) into which human beings are born, distinct from the actual sins that a person commits. It explicitly states that original sin does not have the character of a personal fault in any of Adam's descendants.”

My main point is one of congratulations. The election of Obama has to instill a certain pride about America, and Americans; yes, I am uplifted by the strides we’ve made and doors we’ve opened, even though I am not an Obama supporter – what is validated is that we still live in a land of opportunity. Personally, I wish him all the best, and we should all give him a chance to govern and a chance to lead – this is the least we can accord to the winner of such a grueling election and the victor in this marketing contest we call the presidency.

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I'm sorry that you choose to mock what you don't understand. I've always been religious. What you don't seem to understand is that religion is about what is real, not about stories that are not real. It's about what binds us all together, not what tears us apart.

The idea of original sin has done more harm than good. It has led people to take a dim view of themselves but maybe more important, it has led people to take a dim view of others. Somehow we usually manage to apply supposedly universal moral truths to everyone but ourselves.

On the other hand, the value of an idea like this is that it points to those occasions when an evil act affects many people for generations. Our country's treatment of black people is an example of that. The United States is still paying the price of slavery, economically and culturally. You can refuse to see it if you want to, but you do yourself no credit parading your ignorance around as though it was something to be proud of.

"I've always been religious." Really! What ever happened to the old atheist Paul? "religion is about what is real". Like Kool-Aid? I suppose that means you're a wacky tree hugger.

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One word sums up your entire post; Gobbledygook.

1. If you had something to say, you'd say it.

2. The proper punctuation is a colon, not a semi-colon.

One word sums up you: stupid. (Note proper punctuation.)

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It is written here that, “But his election is the closest thing America can have to redemption for our original sin.” I respect the comment but I will refrain from a response and only note that as an American I personally am not guilty of “our” alleged original sin; I did not commit this grave offense, and consequently, do not need redemption. Nonetheless, to clarify the term I cite Wikipedia, “Original sin is, according to a doctrine in Christian theology, humanity's state of sin resulting from the Fall of Man.” “Roman Catholic teaching regards original sin as the general condition of sinfulness (lack of holiness) into which human beings are born, distinct from the actual sins that a person commits. It explicitly states that original sin does not have the character of a personal fault in any of Adam's descendants.”

My main point is one of congratulations. The election of Obama has to instill a certain pride about America, and Americans; yes, I am uplifted by the strides we’ve made and doors we’ve opened, even though I am not an Obama supporter – what is validated is that we still live in a land of opportunity. Personally, I wish him all the best, and we should all give him a chance to govern and a chance to lead – this is the least we can accord to the winner of such a grueling election and the victor in this marketing contest we call the presidency.

That's exactly the point. Future generations pay for something they did not do. You don't have to believe in the Judeo-Christian fairy tale to get the point. We know it's a fairy tale because a just god wouldn't do it that way.

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"I've always been religious." Really! What ever happened to the old atheist Paul? "religion is about what is real". Like Kool-Aid? I suppose that means you're a wacky tree hugger.

Shouldn't a religious person care about having a world with trees in it?

Maybe you don't understand what religion is.

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"I've always been religious." Really! What ever happened to the old atheist Paul? "religion is about what is real". Like Kool-Aid? I suppose that means you're a wacky tree hugger.

So apparently you think religion is about what is not real. That says it all.

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"I've always been religious." Really! What ever happened to the old atheist Paul? "religion is about what is real". Like Kool-Aid? I suppose that means you're a wacky tree hugger.

Your ideas about religion are not the only ideas.

Your way of practicing religion is not the only way.

There are plenty of religious people who don’t believe in a god.

There are plenty of religions that don’t have a god. Buddhism and Humanism are just two examples. From what I know of Paul, he is a Humanist. http://forums.kearnyontheweb.com/index.php...ost&p=85935 What’s the problem?

There is a difference between going to church and being religious.

You may think your incessant references to Kool-Aid are clever. Most of us don’t see it that way. A truly religious person would not make remarks like that.

There is nothing religious about making fun of people, especially people you obviously don’t understand.

And speaking for myself, I like trees. I think they are important. You won’t like it if we continue to deplete our forests. There will be more deserts and less crop land. Millions of people will starve. If we lose enough trees, billions of people will starve. You won’t be making fun of anyone then. You won’t be laughing. You’ll be crying. A lot. You’ll be fighting off your neighbors for whatever food might still be available. You won’t be thinking about the Yankees or the Giants. You’ll be spending every minute trying to survive and make it so your children survive – if you have children. Maybe that’s your idea of fun. It’s not mine. So making fun of people who think trees are important does not speak well of you. It diminishes you.

Making fun of people who care about the natural environment that sustains our lives has been very popular for the past 30 years of so. Truly religious people care about how their decisions and activities will affect people 100 years from now. If the human species survives, history will not treat these past 30 years of our history kindly. Your sarcasm and contempt appear to be your way of ignoring the inconvenient truth that you don’t want to face. If we do that as a people, we are going to destroy ourselves.

You may think your ways are the only ways and your beliefs are the only beliefs. You are wrong.

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Your ideas about religion are not the only ideas.

Your way of practicing religion is not the only way.

There are plenty of religious people who don’t believe in a god.

There are plenty of religions that don’t have a god. Buddhism and Humanism are just two examples. From what I know of Paul, he is a Humanist. http://forums.kearnyontheweb.com/index.php...ost&p=85935 What’s the problem?

There is a difference between going to church and being religious.

You may think your incessant references to Kool-Aid are clever. Most of us don’t see it that way. A truly religious person would not make remarks like that.

There is nothing religious about making fun of people, especially people you obviously don’t understand.

And speaking for myself, I like trees. I think they are important. You won’t like it if we continue to deplete our forests. There will be more deserts and less crop land. Millions of people will starve. If we lose enough trees, billions of people will starve. You won’t be making fun of anyone then. You won’t be laughing. You’ll be crying. A lot. You’ll be fighting off your neighbors for whatever food might still be available. You won’t be thinking about the Yankees or the Giants. You’ll be spending every minute trying to survive and make it so your children survive – if you have children. Maybe that’s your idea of fun. It’s not mine. So making fun of people who think trees are important does not speak well of you. It diminishes you.

Making fun of people who care about the natural environment that sustains our lives has been very popular for the past 30 years of so. Truly religious people care about how their decisions and activities will affect people 100 years from now. If the human species survives, history will not treat these past 30 years of our history kindly. Your sarcasm and contempt appear to be your way of ignoring the inconvenient truth that you don’t want to face. If we do that as a people, we are going to destroy ourselves.

You may think your ways are the only ways and your beliefs are the only beliefs. You are wrong.

When did you become Paul's spokesman? Or are you one of Paul's multiple personalities? Which raises a question......Are all of Paul's multiple personalities atheist or are one or more Christian?

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That's exactly the point. Future generations pay for something they did not do. You don't have to believe in the Judeo-Christian fairy tale to get the point. We know it's a fairy tale because a just god wouldn't do it that way.

I respect what was said, what you said and I'm certain there are many who agree with you; however, I don't necessarily have to agree to your point, and in this instance, I don't. I don't believe this respectful disagree automatically makes me a bad person either.

I can acknowledge and easily recognize fairy tales such as Hans Christian Andersen, SurLaLune, Mother Goose, the Brothers Grimm and Children's and Household Tales, Aesop's Fables and even Lewis Carroll, but cannot quite come to grips with or quite understand the Judeo-Christian one you allude to? I am also not in a position to judge God, so I'll refrain from a comment about Him in here as well.

I willingly assume responsibility for my actions, realize that there are consequences to things I do, and I understand I must "pay" for them as I must; but future generations are not obligated to "pay" for my past actions, mistakes or indiscretions; they may suffer the consequences of such actions but are not responsible to "pay" for them.

Once more, my congratulations to the president-elect and all the best to him and his team.

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"I've always been religious." Really! What ever happened to the old atheist Paul? "religion is about what is real". Like Kool-Aid? I suppose that means you're a wacky tree hugger.

What it means is that there is no separation between my religion and my life. There is never a conflict between the best course of action and the dictates of my religion. That's because I practice a reality-based religion. That doesn't mean that I have all the answers or that all the answers are clear, but it does mean that there is greater moral and ethical clarity than I could find in any other religion. I stand by everything I wrote here: http://forums.kearnyontheweb.com/index.php...ost&p=85935

I would welcome an intelligent discussion. You're never going to understand another human being, whether me or anyone else, if you don't stop telling us what we think and start listening. Don't you ever get tired of behaving like a badly spoiled child?

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When did you become Paul's spokesman? Or are you one of Paul's multiple personalities? Which raises a question......Are all of Paul's multiple personalities atheist or are one or more Christian?

You just have to explain away everything you don't understand by diminishing and attacking someone, don't you. "Heaven forbid" that you should actually think about what was written and respond in a thoughtful and intelligent way to discuss the issues raised.

Next time you are confronted with something you don't agree with, don't lash out like an angry fool. Think.

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I respect what was said, what you said and I'm certain there are many who agree with you; however, I don't necessarily have to agree to your point, and in this instance, I don't. I don't believe this respectful disagree automatically makes me a bad person either.

I can acknowledge and easily recognize fairy tales such as Hans Christian Andersen, SurLaLune, Mother Goose, the Brothers Grimm and Children's and Household Tales, Aesop's Fables and even Lewis Carroll, but cannot quite come to grips with or quite understand the Judeo-Christian one you allude to? I am also not in a position to judge God, so I'll refrain from a comment about Him in here as well.

I willingly assume responsibility for my actions, realize that there are consequences to things I do, and I understand I must "pay" for them as I must; but future generations are not obligated to "pay" for my past actions, mistakes or indiscretions; they may suffer the consequences of such actions but are not responsible to "pay" for them.

Once more, my congratulations to the president-elect and all the best to him and his team.

The reason future generations aren't "responsible" to "pay for" your mistakes is that it's unjust. I agree with you, but they're going to pay anyway if our mistakes are bad enough.

The Adam and Eve story says that a perfectly just God makes future generations pay for two people's mistake. That's one way we know the story is a fairy tale. If God was just, he wouldn't do that. Add to that the talking snake, people created out of nothing, Cain's wife somehow appearing out of nowhere, and it's pretty obvious that the story is a fairy tale. And that tree of the knowledge of good and evil - exactly what fruit grows on it? Do you think maybe "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil" just might be a metaphor and not a real tree? If hundreds of millions of people didn't believe in this poorly constructed fairy tale, you'd be treating it just like Mother Goose.

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