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Kearny is at war with Christmas and won't acknowledge the historical tradition of displaying a Christmas Tree Even so ,to all

the Kearny Christians who are proud to display a Christmas Tree, I wish you a Merry Christmas and a blessed new year.

To the grinch who is the mayor, I send my condolences for your obsessive compulsion to remove Christ from Christmas.

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Kearny is at war with Christmas and won't acknowledge the historical tradition of displaying a Christmas Tree Even so ,to all

the Kearny Christians who are proud to display a Christmas Tree, I wish you a Merry Christmas and a blessed new year.

To the grinch who is the mayor, I send my condolences for your obsessive compulsion to remove Christ from Christmas.

And Merry Christmas to all, even those that claim to be Christians but spew very unChristian messages even on Christmas.
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You got your butt kicked on another topic about the exact same thing. Did you really think that opening another page would change any of that?

You got your tree, and it's right next to a nativity scene. You're not satisfied because you want to force everyone to call it a Christmas tree. But government isn't supposed to promote your religion. The town has one holiday display, and the law requires the town to make that display include everyone. That way everyone is equal, as in the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. The White House has many displays, and acknowledges other religions with those. Call the tree what you want and stop trying to push your religion.

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Kearny is at war with Christmas and won't acknowledge the historical tradition of displaying a Christmas Tree Even so ,to all

the Kearny Christians who are proud to display a Christmas Tree, I wish you a Merry Christmas and a blessed new year.

To the grinch who is the mayor, I send my condolences for your obsessive compulsion to remove Christ from Christmas.

'Tis the season to whine that you didn't get your way? Too bad you didn't have anything better to do on Christmas Eve.

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Guest 2smart4u

You got your butt kicked on another topic about the exact same thing. Did you really think that opening another page would change any of that?

You got your tree, and it's right next to a nativity scene. You're not satisfied because you want to force everyone to call it a Christmas tree. But government isn't supposed to promote your religion. The town has one holiday display, and the law requires the town to make that display include everyone. That way everyone is equal, as in the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. The White House has many displays, and acknowledges other religions with those. Call the tree what you want and stop trying to push your religion.

"promote your religion" ?? What religion would that be ?

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"promote your religion" ?? What religion would that be ?

Christianity. It's not the only religion represented in Kearny.

Why do you refuse to admit that there's a Christian manger scene right next to the tree? All your whining is about absolutely nothing, except that you want to force your religion on everyone else.

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Guest 2smart4u

Christianity. It's not the only religion represented in Kearny.

Why do you refuse to admit that there's a Christian manger scene right next to the tree? All your whining is about absolutely nothing, except that you want to force your religion on everyone else.

Christianity is not a religion, it's a philosophy. Catholic, Methodist, Presbyterian, etc. are religions.

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Today's lame excuse: "Christianity is not a religion."

When you ask people their religion, no one ever says "I'm a Christian"?

When you fill out forms that include religion, there's never a box that says "Christian"?

When "Kearny Christian" posts, is he/she telling us his/her philosophy or his/her religion?

If Christianity is a philosophy, then how can it encompass people from Martin Luther King, Jr., to blatant racists?

What do all Christians agree on that makes Christianity a philosophy? Nothing.

Christianity is not just a philosophy, which is a way of thinking. It's a religion, a way of living, with a story and a set of commands, complete with punishments. Of course, not all Christians agree on what the punishments are. Some don't even agree that there are any punishments. Which is another reason it's not a philosophy.

Many apologists say whatever is convenient in the moment, without any regard for the facts or even what they said yesterday. So today, for one day only, Christianity isn't a religion. At least on this page.

If you have to make arguments as lame as "Christianity is not a religion" to defend your point of view, maybe it's time to stop trying to defend that point of view. It's time to change your mind.

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Christianity is not a religion, it's a philosophy. Catholic, Methodist, Presbyterian, etc. are religions.

We are discussing this issue because the First Amendment, made applicable to the states through the Equal Protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, prohibits the states and their subsidiary parts (like towns and cities) from promoting a religion. So the question whether Christianity is a religion is a legal question. The following cases from the U.S. Supreme Court refer to “the Christian religion,” making clear that for most of our history the point was never questioned: Vidal v. Girard's Executors, 43 U.S. 2 How. 127 (1844); Church of the Holy Trinity v. United States, 143 U.S. 457 (1892). School Dist. of Abington Tp. v. Schempp, 374 U.S. 203 (1963), contains several references to “the Christian religion.” In that case, the school district tried the argument that Christianity is not a religion, and the Supreme Court rejected it. So not until fifty years ago did anyone even question that Christianity was a religion – and who did it? Why, Christian apologists, of course, who have no problem “lying for Jesus.”

In Engel v. Vitale, 370 U.S. 421 (1962), the Supreme Court struck down mandatory prayer time in the public schools, favorably quoting James Madison (primary author of the U.S. Constitution) as follows:Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity, in exclusion of all other Religions, may establish with the same ease any particular sect of Christians, in exclusion of all other Sects? That the same authority which can force a citizen to contribute three pence only of his property for the support of any one establishment, may force him to conform to any other establishment in all cases whatsoever?"

In other words, you’re wrong, as usual. And if you want a second opinion, doing it your way would be a horrible idea.

But why should we listen to the Supreme Court on a legal question? Let’s turn to real authorities. The following Christian authors refer many times to the Christian religion:

John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion (1563).

Hugo Grotius, The Truth of the Christian Religion (1622).

Richard Baxter, The Reasons of the Christian Religion (1667).

Robert Jenkins, The Reasonableness and Certainty of the Christian Religion (1708).

Blaise Pascal, who was a philosopher, framed his famous/infamous wager in terms of “the Christian religion.”

Benjamin Franklin wrote of “the excellency of the Christian religion above all others, ancient or modern.”

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, The Positivity of the Christian Religion (ca. 1796).

Hannah Adams, The Truth and Excellence of the Christian Religion Exhibited (1804).

Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Volume Two, Chapter I, Part 5, “How religion uses democratic instincts in the United States” (1840).

Anthony Collins, A Discourse on the Grounds and Reasons of the Christian Religion (1841).

Daniel Webster, “A Defence of the Christian Religion,” delivered before the U.S. Supreme Court on February 10, 1844.

Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church, Vol. 1 (1853). [http://www.ccel.org/s/schaff/history/1_ch01.htm ]

August Neander, General History of the Christian Religion and Church (published in America 1870).

A.M. Fairbairn, Philosophy of the Christian Religion (1908).

Gerald Birney Smith, A Guide to the Study of the Christian Religion (1916).

Billy Graham, 1947: see Zakaullah, Religion and Politics in America, p. 64.

President Eisenhower used to refer to “Judeo-Christian religion,” a phrase still used by conservative American Christians when they want to convince people that they are being inclusive. [see Martin E. Marty, Modern American Religions (1996), p. 332.]

Martin Luther King, Jr., “Communism’s Challenge to Christianity,” August 9, 1953.

Bob Jones, Romanism and the Charismatic Movement (1981).

Josh McDowell, Evidence That Demands a Verdict (1992).

Hans Schwartz, Theology in a Global Context: The Last Two Hundred Years (2005).

No doubt there are thousands of published writings by leading Christian scholars, theologians and plain-old Bible-thumpers saying the same thing.

Or we could ask people from all over the country and the world what they think their religion is. Sources that demonstrate a sizeable portion of populations around the world self-identify their religion as Christian include the American Religious Identification Surveys, census data from the U.S. government (see, for example, http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0075.pdf ), and the Pew Forum for international data (see http://www.pewforum.org/2012/12/18/global-religious-landscape-exec/ ). The mere fact that a growing percentage of Christians self-identify as non-denominational Christians, alone, puts the claim that Christianity is not a religion to rest.

There isn’t a shred of evidence to support the statement that Christianity is not a religion. A mountain of evidence disproves it.

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Christianity is not a religion, it's a philosophy. Catholic, Methodist, Presbyterian, etc. are religions.

You're only saying that because you would like to avoid the legal implications of Christianity being a religion. You want to use government to push it on everyone but in order to do that, you have to deny that you're pushing your religion. Unfortunately for you, most people aren't as stupid as you are.

I'm not even sure you're too smart for my goldfish.

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We are discussing this issue because the First Amendment, made applicable to the states through the Equal Protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, prohibits the states and their subsidiary parts (like towns and cities) from promoting a religion. So the question whether Christianity is a religion is a legal question. The following cases from the U.S. Supreme Court refer to “the Christian religion,” making clear that for most of our history the point was never questioned: Vidal v. Girard's Executors, 43 U.S. 2 How. 127 (1844); Church of the Holy Trinity v. United States, 143 U.S. 457 (1892). School Dist. of Abington Tp. v. Schempp, 374 U.S. 203 (1963), contains several references to “the Christian religion.” In that case, the school district tried the argument that Christianity is not a religion, and the Supreme Court rejected it. So not until fifty years ago did anyone even question that Christianity was a religion – and who did it? Why, Christian apologists, of course, who have no problem “lying for Jesus.”

In Engel v. Vitale, 370 U.S. 421 (1962), the Supreme Court struck down mandatory prayer time in the public schools, favorably quoting James Madison (primary author of the U.S. Constitution) as follows:Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity, in exclusion of all other Religions, may establish with the same ease any particular sect of Christians, in exclusion of all other Sects? That the same authority which can force a citizen to contribute three pence only of his property for the support of any one establishment, may force him to conform to any other establishment in all cases whatsoever?"

In other words, you’re wrong, as usual. And if you want a second opinion, doing it your way would be a horrible idea.

But why should we listen to the Supreme Court on a legal question? Let’s turn to real authorities. The following Christian authors refer many times to the Christian religion:

John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion (1563).

Hugo Grotius, The Truth of the Christian Religion (1622).

Richard Baxter, The Reasons of the Christian Religion (1667).

Robert Jenkins, The Reasonableness and Certainty of the Christian Religion (1708).

Blaise Pascal, who was a philosopher, framed his famous/infamous wager in terms of “the Christian religion.”

Benjamin Franklin wrote of “the excellency of the Christian religion above all others, ancient or modern.”

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, The Positivity of the Christian Religion (ca. 1796).

Hannah Adams, The Truth and Excellence of the Christian Religion Exhibited (1804).

Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America, Volume Two, Chapter I, Part 5, “How religion uses democratic instincts in the United States” (1840).

Anthony Collins, A Discourse on the Grounds and Reasons of the Christian Religion (1841).

Daniel Webster, “A Defence of the Christian Religion,” delivered before the U.S. Supreme Court on February 10, 1844.

Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church, Vol. 1 (1853). [http://www.ccel.org/s/schaff/history/1_ch01.htm ]

August Neander, General History of the Christian Religion and Church (published in America 1870).

A.M. Fairbairn, Philosophy of the Christian Religion (1908).

Gerald Birney Smith, A Guide to the Study of the Christian Religion (1916).

Billy Graham, 1947: see Zakaullah, Religion and Politics in America, p. 64.

President Eisenhower used to refer to “Judeo-Christian religion,” a phrase still used by conservative American Christians when they want to convince people that they are being inclusive. [see Martin E. Marty, Modern American Religions (1996), p. 332.]

Martin Luther King, Jr., “Communism’s Challenge to Christianity,” August 9, 1953.

Bob Jones, Romanism and the Charismatic Movement (1981).

Josh McDowell, Evidence That Demands a Verdict (1992).

Hans Schwartz, Theology in a Global Context: The Last Two Hundred Years (2005).

No doubt there are thousands of published writings by leading Christian scholars, theologians and plain-old Bible-thumpers saying the same thing.

Or we could ask people from all over the country and the world what they think their religion is. Sources that demonstrate a sizeable portion of populations around the world self-identify their religion as Christian include the American Religious Identification Surveys, census data from the U.S. government (see, for example, http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0075.pdf ), and the Pew Forum for international data (see http://www.pewforum.org/2012/12/18/global-religious-landscape-exec/ ). The mere fact that a growing percentage of Christians self-identify as non-denominational Christians, alone, puts the claim that Christianity is not a religion to rest.

There isn’t a shred of evidence to support the statement that Christianity is not a religion. A mountain of evidence disproves it.

What a butt-kickin'!

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