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How about pulling the tax discussion together?


Guest Paul
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I've seen a few interesting ideas in the weeks since these discussions on Kearny property taxes started. I don't know whether any of them has merit, but wish to explore further. In today's Observer, for example, John Pinho suggested that the town's financial information be posted online so everyone can see it. That would certainly open access to the information. Are there any reasons we shouldn't do it?

John's suggestion regarding United Water also interests me. Again, I don't know whether it has merit, but at least it's an idea.

Someone else suggested having consultants come in to analyze our situation, and paying them on a contingency basis of how much they saved us in taxes. I'd need to think that through very carefully, but at least it's an idea. Let's get a lot of ideas, and then pick the ones that seem the most promising; then explore them in depth.

And let's work together. That means that people must come forward, in person and by name. You can start this kind of discussion in a forum like this, but we can't take it very far without putting our names behind it.

So instead of fighting about these issues, and since we're all interested in the same thing, how could we pull together to address this? Would the mayor and council entertain an organized dialogue? If so, what forum should it take? I'm not interested in a shouting match, but a real dialogue on what seem to be the most promising ideas. To me, that would mean that responsible spokespeople would have to be selected to conduct the discussion with our town officials. Is there a way to structure something like that, and if so, how do we go about making it happen?

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Blah, Blah, Blah....Can't we all just get along????

I've seen a few interesting ideas in the weeks since these discussions on Kearny property taxes started. I don't know whether any of them has merit, but wish to explore further. In today's Observer, for example, John Pinho suggested that the town's financial information be posted online so everyone can see it. That would certainly open access to the information. Are there any reasons we shouldn't do it?

John's suggestion regarding United Water also interests me. Again, I don't know whether it has merit, but at least it's an idea.

Someone else suggested having consultants come in to analyze our situation, and paying them on a contingency basis of how much they saved us in taxes. I'd need to think that through very carefully, but at least it's an idea. Let's get a lot of ideas, and then pick the ones that seem the most promising; then explore them in depth.

And let's work together. That means that people must come forward, in person and by name. You can start this kind of discussion in a forum like this, but we can't take it very far without putting our names behind it.

So instead of fighting about these issues, and since we're all interested in the same thing, how could we pull together to address this? Would the mayor and council entertain an organized dialogue? If so, what forum should it take? I'm not interested in a shouting match, but a real dialogue on what seem to be the most promising ideas. To me, that would mean that responsible spokespeople would have to be selected to conduct the discussion with our town officials. Is there a way to structure something like that, and if so, how do we go about making it happen?

70414[/snapback]

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I've seen a few interesting ideas in the weeks since these discussions on Kearny property taxes started. I don't know whether any of them has merit, but wish to explore further. In today's Observer, for example, John Pinho suggested that the town's financial information be posted online so everyone can see it. That would certainly open access to the information. Are there any reasons we shouldn't do it?

John's suggestion regarding United Water also interests me. Again, I don't know whether it has merit, but at least it's an idea.

Someone else suggested having consultants come in to analyze our situation, and paying them on a contingency basis of how much they saved us in taxes. I'd need to think that through very carefully, but at least it's an idea. Let's get a lot of ideas, and then pick the ones that seem the most promising; then explore them in depth.

And let's work together. That means that people must come forward, in person and by name. You can start this kind of discussion in a forum like this, but we can't take it very far without putting our names behind it.

So instead of fighting about these issues, and since we're all interested in the same thing, how could we pull together to address this? Would the mayor and council entertain an organized dialogue? If so, what forum should it take? I'm not interested in a shouting match, but a real dialogue on what seem to be the most promising ideas. To me, that would mean that responsible spokespeople would have to be selected to conduct the discussion with our town officials. Is there a way to structure something like that, and if so, how do we go about making it happen?

70414[/snapback]

With apologies to PETA, there's always more than one way to skin a cat. It seems as though most people are looking at ways to cut costs - putting the police, fire, teachers and town employees in the crosshairs (as well as general town services). And while there may be some fat to trim, no one seems to be looking at the other side of the ledger. How about some ways to increase tax revenue from sources OTHER than current taxpayers - through redevelopment incentives to encourage new private investments in the town.

There really is a lot of money is this town, and much of it rests comfortably in the pockets of property owners who live in other towns. How about a campaign to convince (not threaten with eminent domain as was previously tried in the "redevelopment" campaign) and otherwise incentivize these individuals to redevelop their own properties into buildings, housing, offices, etc. that will ultimately yield higher taxes for the town, and that will ultimately yield a higher return on investment for the owners.

Perhaps we should also consider a campaign that seeks to draw private investment into the town that focuses on some of the town "assets", such as location to major transportation arteries, proximity to (and views of) manhattan, good labor pool, etc.

It was a HUGE mistake to start threatening "redevelopment" several years ago - which was another term for eminent domain. The town wasted boatloads of cash on consultants to go around snapping photos of properties that the town can not touch due to recent legal decisions and its financial crisis. Some of the property owners that I know got spooked and decided not to go forward with certain investments that would have benefitted the town.

For a variety of reasons, the mayor needs to put that card back in his pocket, and focus on a marketing campaign to draw private development dollars into the town. Not only does the concept have the opportunity to increase tax receipts but, depending upon the types of properties and business drawn to the town, it can also serve to increase the amenities available to town residents.

Just a thought ...

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With apologies to PETA, there's always more than one way to skin a cat.  It seems as though most people are looking at ways to cut costs - putting the police, fire, teachers and town employees in the crosshairs (as well as general town services).  And while there may be some fat to trim, no one seems to be looking at the other side of the ledger.  How about some ways to increase tax revenue from sources OTHER than current taxpayers - through redevelopment incentives to encourage new private investments in the town.

There really is a lot of money is this town, and much of it rests comfortably in the pockets of property owners who live in other towns.  How about a campaign to convince (not threaten with eminent domain as was previously tried in the "redevelopment" campaign) and otherwise incentivize these individuals to redevelop their own properties into buildings, housing, offices, etc. that will ultimately yield higher taxes for the town, and that will ultimately yield a higher return on investment for the owners.

Perhaps we should also consider a campaign that seeks to draw private investment into the town that focuses on some of the town "assets", such as location to major transportation arteries, proximity to (and views of) manhattan, good labor pool, etc.

It was a HUGE mistake to start threatening "redevelopment" several years ago - which was another term for eminent domain.  The town wasted boatloads of cash on consultants to go around snapping photos of properties that the town can not touch due to recent legal decisions and its financial crisis.  Some of the property owners that I know got spooked and decided not to go forward with certain investments that would have benefitted the town. 

For a variety of reasons, the mayor needs to put that card back in his pocket, and focus on a marketing campaign to draw private development dollars into the town.  Not only does the concept have the opportunity to increase tax receipts but, depending upon the types of properties and business drawn to the town, it can also serve to increase the amenities available to town residents.

Just a thought ...

70560[/snapback]

Sounds interesting to me. I'm reminded of a post somewhere around here where someone suggested getting profits from a camera system to automatically catch and ticket speeders. Any thoughts on that?

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With apologies to PETA, there's always more than one way to skin a cat.  It seems as though most people are looking at ways to cut costs - putting the police, fire, teachers and town employees in the crosshairs (as well as general town services).  And while there may be some fat to trim, no one seems to be looking at the other side of the ledger.  How about some ways to increase tax revenue from sources OTHER than current taxpayers - through redevelopment incentives to encourage new private investments in the town.

There really is a lot of money is this town, and much of it rests comfortably in the pockets of property owners who live in other towns.  How about a campaign to convince (not threaten with eminent domain as was previously tried in the "redevelopment" campaign) and otherwise incentivize these individuals to redevelop their own properties into buildings, housing, offices, etc. that will ultimately yield higher taxes for the town, and that will ultimately yield a higher return on investment for the owners.

Perhaps we should also consider a campaign that seeks to draw private investment into the town that focuses on some of the town "assets", such as location to major transportation arteries, proximity to (and views of) manhattan, good labor pool, etc.

It was a HUGE mistake to start threatening "redevelopment" several years ago - which was another term for eminent domain.  The town wasted boatloads of cash on consultants to go around snapping photos of properties that the town can not touch due to recent legal decisions and its financial crisis.  Some of the property owners that I know got spooked and decided not to go forward with certain investments that would have benefitted the town. 

For a variety of reasons, the mayor needs to put that card back in his pocket, and focus on a marketing campaign to draw private development dollars into the town.  Not only does the concept have the opportunity to increase tax receipts but, depending upon the types of properties and business drawn to the town, it can also serve to increase the amenities available to town residents.

Just a thought ...

70560[/snapback]

Of all the ideas I've seen so far, this one makes the most sense to me, and has the most potential to make a real and positive impact on our finances. Kearny is ten miles from Manhattan. There's no reason why it shouldn't explode economically. When I moved in nearly 20 years ago, I couldn't believe this little town was just sitting so close to the nation's largest and most vibrant city.

Whomever you are, contact me. Let's form a group to explore this.

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With apologies to PETA, there's always more than one way to skin a cat.  It seems as though most people are looking at ways to cut costs - putting the police, fire, teachers and town employees in the crosshairs (as well as general town services).  And while there may be some fat to trim, no one seems to be looking at the other side of the ledger.  How about some ways to increase tax revenue from sources OTHER than current taxpayers - through redevelopment incentives to encourage new private investments in the town.

There really is a lot of money is this town, and much of it rests comfortably in the pockets of property owners who live in other towns.  How about a campaign to convince (not threaten with eminent domain as was previously tried in the "redevelopment" campaign) and otherwise incentivize these individuals to redevelop their own properties into buildings, housing, offices, etc. that will ultimately yield higher taxes for the town, and that will ultimately yield a higher return on investment for the owners.

Perhaps we should also consider a campaign that seeks to draw private investment into the town that focuses on some of the town "assets", such as location to major transportation arteries, proximity to (and views of) manhattan, good labor pool, etc.

It was a HUGE mistake to start threatening "redevelopment" several years ago - which was another term for eminent domain.  The town wasted boatloads of cash on consultants to go around snapping photos of properties that the town can not touch due to recent legal decisions and its financial crisis.  Some of the property owners that I know got spooked and decided not to go forward with certain investments that would have benefitted the town. 

For a variety of reasons, the mayor needs to put that card back in his pocket, and focus on a marketing campaign to draw private development dollars into the town.  Not only does the concept have the opportunity to increase tax receipts but, depending upon the types of properties and business drawn to the town, it can also serve to increase the amenities available to town residents.

Just a thought ...

70560[/snapback]

This mayor better act quick.

Because people are getting out (many homes for sale) and I doubt as many are coming in (buying homes) due to the high taxes.

He better wise up or his days are numbered.

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This mayor better act quick.

Because people are getting out (many homes for sale) and I doubt as many are coming in (buying homes) due to the high taxes.

He better wise up or his days are numbered.

70589[/snapback]

Don't worry Kearny, our good mayor will float some bonds and all will be well for a little while. And that's just for the O&E. See no problemo all is well. Oh my, I forgot D'Arco's salary.

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Guest Opportunist Negator
This mayor better act quick.

Because people are getting out (many homes for sale) and I doubt as many are coming in (buying homes) due to the high taxes.

He better wise up or his days are numbered.

70589[/snapback]

How does the unsold inventory of homes in Kearny compare to other communities in New Jersey? It's turned into an ugly bear market throughout the State and most of the country. Florida and Michigan are disasters. Kearny's weathering the storm better than most. If you don't believe me, speak to real estate brokers in Bergen County.

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Guest Studies and Observations
Of all the ideas I've seen so far, this one makes the most sense to me, and has the most potential to make a real and positive impact on our finances. Kearny is ten miles from Manhattan. There's no reason why it shouldn't explode economically. When I moved in nearly 20 years ago, I couldn't believe this little town was just sitting so close to the nation's largest and most vibrant city.

Whomever you are, contact me. Let's form a group to explore this.

70582[/snapback]

Explore what exactly??? The Town had an opportunity years ago to push to Develop South Kearny. Instead they treat it like qa red-headed stepchild. The roads are like washboards, NOTHING is every repaired until there are several complaints and potential suits. Why would ANY business move down there??? Post 9-11 again, the potential for serious development was there..office space was at a premium with close proximity to Journal Square, the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels..and the Town did Nothing to try and bring in business...Nope we got more Truck parking lots, that bring in the minimum Ratables. It's NOT just the current Administration..EVERY Mayor and council since the Shipyards closed, and Western Electric moved out have ignored South Kearny, to the taxpayers detriment.

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Explore what exactly???  The Town had an opportunity years ago to push to Develop South Kearny.  Instead they treat it like qa red-headed stepchild.  The roads are like washboards, NOTHING is every repaired until there are several complaints and potential suits.  Why would ANY business move down there???  Post 9-11 again, the potential for serious development was there..office space was at a premium with close proximity to Journal Square, the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels..and the Town did Nothing to try and bring in business...Nope we got more Truck parking lots, that bring in the minimum Ratables.  It's NOT just the current Administration..EVERY Mayor and council since the Shipyards closed, and Western Electric moved out have ignored South Kearny, to the taxpayers detriment.

71247[/snapback]

So what would you do? That's the answer to your question.

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Guest Radagast
Explore what exactly???  The Town had an opportunity years ago to push to Develop South Kearny.  Instead they treat it like qa red-headed stepchild.  The roads are like washboards, NOTHING is every repaired until there are several complaints and potential suits.  Why would ANY business move down there???  Post 9-11 again, the potential for serious development was there..office space was at a premium with close proximity to Journal Square, the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels..and the Town did Nothing to try and bring in business...Nope we got more Truck parking lots, that bring in the minimum Ratables.  It's NOT just the current Administration..EVERY Mayor and council since the Shipyards closed, and Western Electric moved out have ignored South Kearny, to the taxpayers detriment.

71247[/snapback]

Two words, Tax Abatement.

No one has ever had the round ones to push the idea and it would still work.

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Explore what exactly???  The Town had an opportunity years ago to push to Develop South Kearny.  Instead they treat it like qa red-headed stepchild.  The roads are like washboards, NOTHING is every repaired until there are several complaints and potential suits.  Why would ANY business move down there???  Post 9-11 again, the potential for serious development was there..office space was at a premium with close proximity to Journal Square, the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels..and the Town did Nothing to try and bring in business...Nope we got more Truck parking lots, that bring in the minimum Ratables.  It's NOT just the current Administration..EVERY Mayor and council since the Shipyards closed, and Western Electric moved out have ignored South Kearny, to the taxpayers detriment.

71247[/snapback]

While I fully understand that people want to offer their opinions on a topic, I find it disheartening when they don't do their homework first.

A large portion of South Kearny, 409 acres to be exact, was designated a foreign-trade zone, being added to the NY/NJ Port Authority Trade Zone 49 on September 8 of this year. Just because the local papers may not have covered it doesn't mean you shouldn't know about it. This designation allows export business in the zone to operate duty free or duty deferred operations. The area has 5.5 million square feet of warehouse and distribution space already in place, with another 300,000 square feet planned in the near future. The application for the designation was made in 2005, right about the same time the plans for a new Wittpenn Bridge and adjacent new, wider roadways were announced. This was all discussed and approved at open Town Council meetings.

Part of the overall problem of drawing new business into South Kearny is the contamination of the land from previous, long gone companies. Because the cost of decontamination is so steep that the feasability of construction is out of the question, only those businesses that can encapsulate the property, such as truck terminals, can consider a move to the area. Although their ratables may be low, it appears that this is a better option than taxes owed by bankrupt, previous owners, doesn't it? This same contamination must also be considered when talking about street repairs.

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How does the unsold inventory of homes in Kearny compare to other communities in New Jersey?  It's turned into an ugly bear market throughout the State and most of the country.  Florida and Michigan are disasters.  Kearny's weathering the storm better than most.  If you don't believe me, speak to real estate brokers in Bergen County.

70630[/snapback]

I was curious about your comment. The Observer just came out so I decided to see just how many homes are for sale, just in The Observer alone. I understand the town of Kearny is not the same size as the surrounding towns, but I wanted to compare the amount of homes for sale in Kearny and the surrounding towns.

In The Observer only: 10/31/2007

Kearny has about 107 homes for sale.

Harrison has about 37

North Arlington has 21

Why so many homes for sale? Could it be the high taxes? :rolleyes:

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Explore what exactly???  The Town had an opportunity years ago to push to Develop South Kearny.  Instead they treat it like qa red-headed stepchild.  The roads are like washboards, NOTHING is every repaired until there are several complaints and potential suits.  Why would ANY business move down there???  Post 9-11 again, the potential for serious development was there..office space was at a premium with close proximity to Journal Square, the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels..and the Town did Nothing to try and bring in business...Nope we got more Truck parking lots, that bring in the minimum Ratables.  It's NOT just the current Administration..EVERY Mayor and council since the Shipyards closed, and Western Electric moved out have ignored South Kearny, to the taxpayers detriment.

71247[/snapback]

Explore what is involved in the town getting an official marketing campaign together to promote Kearny as a location for business. Kearny can be the model for other towns and, if successful, it can dramatically improve the quality of life for citizens in Kearny (from lowering taxes to increasing amenities). Moreover, it can be a major springboard for the politicans who make it happen.

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Of all the ideas I've seen so far, this one makes the most sense to me, and has the most potential to make a real and positive impact on our finances. Kearny is ten miles from Manhattan. There's no reason why it shouldn't explode economically. When I moved in nearly 20 years ago, I couldn't believe this little town was just sitting so close to the nation's largest and most vibrant city.

Whomever you are, contact me. Let's form a group to explore this.

70582[/snapback]

Sorry Paul, I have been away. I will be in touch.

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Explore what is involved in the town getting an official marketing campaign together to promote Kearny as a location for business.  Kearny can be the model for other towns and, if successful, it can dramatically improve the quality of life for citizens in Kearny (from lowering taxes to increasing amenities).  Moreover, it can be a major springboard for the politicans who make it happen.

71494[/snapback]

Already has been tried and actually succeeded but Mrs. ***** did not like change.

She and her cronies squashed all the ideas. Why don't you ask Mrs. ***** **** (lets not forget the ****) ***** she knows everything! Right *****!

KOTW Note: The above post was edited for content.

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Sorry Paul, I have been away.  I will be in touch.

71495[/snapback]

That won't do anything either the train to NYC is gone and never to come back and all the current council members knew it was going long before they were even on the council. Did they do anything about it Noooooo! direct train routes are considered where the growth potential is.

Please do not grand stand about the warehouses because the international trade zone is only going to make Kearny the Trucking capital of the entire east coast.

The council and Mr. Mangin knew about this in 1999. This is why the raod is being built through the meadowlands from Harrison . The rest of Hudson got the light rail and trains we got the trucks and wait until the project is finished you think it is bad now it will only get worse and there is not a THING any one can do about it. Especially when most of the members of the current council including when MR. Mangin was on the council voted to support it.

This is only one thing JIM people tried to warn you about! Did you listen? Oh and Santos, Cifelli, Doyle, Pettigrew and Susan McCurrie were well aware and are well aware of what is being done.

Stop pointing the finger at Santos they all knew! and are all guilty !!!!!

You should all move out put your houses for sale and go to where life is good ...It is not in Kearny!

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