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MAYOR SANTOS "HIGH TOWN TAXES"


Guest THE SILENT MAJORITY
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Guest THE SILENT MAJORITY

HUGE PROPERTY TAXES are forcing people out of this community. SHAME ON US FOR ALLOWING THIS TO HAPPEN. If your not listening to what Mayor Santos has done and is doing then "your not paying attention". "MANGIN FOR MAYOR"

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Guest BERT DIAZ PUBLIC SCHOOL PRINCIPA
SANTOS & CO. FOR FOUR MORE YEARS OF GOOD GOVERNMENT

Santos will NOT make it the full four years. If you knew what was transpiring on the inside,, you would SAY TO him as a wise soothsayer of long ago advised The Great Julius Caesar," BEWARE OF THE IDES OF MARCH." BEWARE OF THOSE THAT SURROUND YOU". Remind Mayor Santos of his Mantra for this year. IMPLOSION, IMPLOSION,IMPLOSION. They will explode from within. He is in good company.It happened to ex Governor McGreevey so what is the big pretense?

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MAKE A "B" LINE TO THE POLLS ON NOVEMBER 8, 2005. CAST YOUR VOTE FOR FOUR MORE YEARS!

That's a sad slogan!

How about We're committed to justice for Taxpayers of Kearny,Town Workers including Teachers and Military Reserve Members. Can't say that can you!

VOTE FORRESTER FOR GOVERNOR AND WRITE IN MANGIN !!!!!!!!!

We may not win but let's protest our high taxes!

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"MANGIN FOR MAYOR OF KEARNY"

What you should be saying is Select Personal Choice on the voting machine and type in the keyboard at the bottom James Mangin

With a low voter turn out if you get the word out you could win.

Invest in some labels from Labels & Lists and buy some postcards and mail them out town wide.

But what are you going to tell people, log into KearnyOnTheWeb.com for instructions and why they should vote for James Mangin or a set by step on how to vote.

This message board is great but how many voters actually know about the board.

Spend some money Bert Diaz and do a mailing residents will thank you later.

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How much will our taxes go up with this next budget? Mr. Mangin do you know?

The budget introduced by the Mayor and Council will increase taxes $720.28 a year on a home assessed at $100,000.

Now, before A. Realist starts spinning . . .

Fiscal 2005

School Tax Levy - $37,976,997

County Tax Levy - $15,069,106.49

Municipal Tax Levy - $21,473,112.41

Total Tax Levy - $74,519,215.90

Fiscal 2006

School Tax Levy - $39,358,295

County Tax Levy - $15,114,927.17

Municipal Tax Levy (introduced) - $27,672.027.18

Total Tax Levy - $82,145,249.35

Difference - $7,626,033.45

Divided by Net Value Taxable $1,058,747,069

= $0.72028 (or $7.2028 per $100 assessed value)

X $1,000 = $720.28 per $100,000

Remember the outcry over this year's $1.4 million increase in the school tax levy?

Now, think about the public's reaction when they find the municipal tax levy will increase over $7,000,000!

There are also a number of "interesting" items included in this budget that we haven't heard much about. I'll get back to you on that.

Jim Mangin

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The budget introduced by the Mayor and Council will increase taxes $720.28 a year on a home assessed at $100,000.

The operative term here being "introduced". Jimbo, you're purposely misleading, AGAIN! You know very well that a municipal budget is "introduced" warts and all, so as to make the best case possible for State aid. The initial budget is always subject to tweaking and intense scrutiny. The budget that is ultimately approved rarely resembles the one introduced.

Stop with the "worst case scenario" strategy. It won't work. Santos still wins!

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The operative term here being "introduced".  Jimbo, you're purposely misleading, AGAIN! You know very well that a municipal budget is "introduced" warts and all, so as to make the best case possible for State aid. The initial budget is always subject to tweaking and intense scrutiny. The budget that is ultimately approved rarely resembles the one introduced.

Stop with the "worst case scenario" strategy. It won't work. Santos still wins!

Yes this is the introduced budget. But are you saying that it's not real? It just "looks" like this high of a tax increase so we get additional state aid? If that's what you're saying, that's illegal. Did you know that you cannot change a budget after a municipality receives Extraordinary Aid? That's done to prevent municipalities from doing exactly what you say the Santos admininstration is doing. You're gonna get these people in real hot water!

And in the last five years the only "tweaking" ever done was to include some sort of revenue one - shot deal gimmick - like (here we go again) bonding for old water meters, bonding for current expenses, lease payments from re-opening the Keegan Landfill (OK, that one's a 3 year deal). And as far as "intense scrutiny", can you name just one line item that was ever reduced as a result of this intense scrutiny that occurs between the introduced and adopted budget?

Spin, spin, spin.

Jim Mangin

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Guest Guest_onetwothree_*

My Kearny roots go back many many years and sad to say I have to leave I can't afford the taxes. I always thought born in Kearny die in Kearny for me any way. And now I have to leave. Mayor if you are reading these posts.......take a ride around town and see all the FOR SALE signs you can thank yourself for that. And Mr. Mayor at one time I was a fan of yours and supported you.... shame on me. Your making me leave the only place me and my family have ever called home. And what's even sadder is that he probably doesn't even care because if he did...would the realtors be doing such a booming bussiness?

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Guest My two cents.
The operative term here being "introduced".  Jimbo, you're purposely misleading, AGAIN! You know very well that a municipal budget is "introduced" warts and all, so as to make the best case possible for State aid. The initial budget is always subject to tweaking and intense scrutiny. The budget that is ultimately approved rarely resembles the one introduced.

Stop with the "worst case scenario" strategy. It won't work. Santos still wins!

By telling people what the tax increase is, how is that misleading? The question was about the tax increase. Mr. Mangin answered it. Just because you dont olike the answer doesnt make it misleading. My two cents.

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Yes this is the introduced budget. But are you saying that it's not real? It just "looks" like this high of a tax increase so we get additional state aid? If that's what you're saying, that's illegal. Did you know that you cannot change a budget after a municipality receives Extraordinary Aid? That's done to prevent municipalities from doing exactly what you say the Santos admininstration is doing. You're gonna get these people in real hot water!

And in the last five years the only "tweaking" ever done was to include some sort of revenue one - shot deal gimmick - like (here we go again) bonding for old water meters, bonding for current expenses, lease payments from re-opening the Keegan Landfill (OK, that one's a 3 year deal). And as far as "intense scrutiny", can you name just one line item that was ever reduced as a result of this intense scrutiny that occurs between the introduced and adopted budget?

Spin, spin, spin.

Jim Mangin

Stop the nonsense, Jimbo! You know, or at least should know, very well how the process goes.

Of course the introduced budget is a real representation of the anticipated expenses/revenues. But like any budget, it is subject to and susceptible to change UNTIL IT IS ADOPTED. You are incorrect in stating that the awarding of Extraordinary/Discretionary Aid precludes budget changes. The very award itself changes the budget; and the amount of the award determines what, if any, other changes should be made. How could a town possibly do the budget offsets until AFTER the amount of the aid is known. I believe you may be confusing Extraordinary Aid with Aid to Distressed Cities which limits the budgetary powers of the municipalities that accept it. (Shouldn't you know the difference?)

I think you'll find that a considerable reduction was realized in the prior budget when the Town, after intense scrutiny, exercised the option to delay hiring in the police and fire departments until mid budget cycle even though those departments had included the "hires" in the budget for the entire fiscal year. I'm sure that if I had the time to go through and compare the introduced budget to the adopted budget, I could find many others. And I don't mean the few dollars you wanted to shave from Meals on Wheels.

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Stop the nonsense, Jimbo! You know, or at least should know, very well how the process goes.

Of course the introduced budget is a real representation of the anticipated expenses/revenues. But like any budget, it is subject to and susceptible to change UNTIL IT IS ADOPTED. You are incorrect in stating that the awarding of Extraordinary/Discretionary Aid precludes budget changes. The very award itself changes the budget; and the amount of the award determines what, if any, other changes should be made. How could a town possibly do the budget offsets until AFTER the amount of the aid is known. I believe you may be confusing Extraordinary Aid with Aid to Distressed Cities which limits the budgetary powers of the municipalities that accept it. (Shouldn't you know the difference?)

I think you'll find that a considerable reduction was realized in the prior budget when the Town, after intense scrutiny, exercised the option to delay hiring in the police and fire departments until mid budget cycle even though those departments had included the "hires" in the budget for the entire fiscal year. I'm sure that if I had the time to go through and compare the introduced budget to the adopted budget, I could find many others. And I don't mean the few dollars you wanted to shave from Meals on Wheels.

We have a good start by hurting our workers and their families who serve in the military!

Now what else can we do?

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The operative term here being "introduced".  Jimbo, you're purposely misleading, AGAIN! You know very well that a municipal budget is "introduced" warts and all, so as to make the best case possible for State aid. The initial budget is always subject to tweaking and intense scrutiny. The budget that is ultimately approved rarely resembles the one introduced.

Stop with the "worst case scenario" strategy. It won't work. Santos still wins!

You really are all over the place. You admit this budget is designed to look bad so we get more State aid, and then accuse me of "purposely misleading." If what you say is true, isn't that "purposely misleading"?

Maybe what you say is true and this budget is purposely misleading. That would explain why the Town is anticipating only $810,000 in revenue from delinquent taxes. To arrive at this number you apply a formula the State devised. Kearny's figure is actually $1,208,549. If you use the real number, and not the figure in this budget the tax levy is reduced $398,549.

Hey, we just saved taxpayers almost $400,000 and it didn't even require "intense scrutiny."

What will the Mayor do now? Will he take my suggestion and reduce the levy by almost $400,000? Or will he have to come up with some b.s. reason why it won't work? Hmmm, admit Mangin is right, or over-charge taxpayers??? What to do???

Stay tuned. I'm just getting started.

Jim Mangin

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You really are all over the place. You admit this budget is designed to look bad so we get more State aid, and then accuse me of "purposely misleading." If what you say is true, isn't that "purposely misleading"?

Jim Mangin

Where exactly do you find this "admission"? What I said was that the budget is presented "warts and all". (The warts are all real.) It is neither streamlined nor inflated, but is as true a representation as can be produced using the exact numbers where available and the estimated numbers for the variable expenditures and revenues. I would venture a wild guess and say the State of New Jersey is aware of how that goes.

Speaking of "misleading", how about that statement you made regarding the award of Extraordinary Aid precluding budget amendments? You should be red-faced over that one!

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You really are all over the place. You admit this budget is designed to look bad so we get more State aid, and then accuse me of "purposely misleading." If what you say is true, isn't that "purposely misleading"?

Maybe what you say is true and this budget is purposely misleading. That would explain why the Town is anticipating only $810,000 in revenue from delinquent taxes. To arrive at this number you apply a formula the State devised. Kearny's figure is actually $1,208,549. If you use the real number, and not the figure in this budget the tax levy is reduced $398,549.

Hey, we just saved taxpayers almost $400,000 and it didn't even require "intense scrutiny."

What will the Mayor do now? Will he take my suggestion and reduce the levy by almost $400,000? Or will he have to come up with some b.s. reason why it won't work? Hmmm, admit Mangin is right, or over-charge taxpayers??? What to do???

Stay tuned. I'm just getting started.

Jim Mangin

go get em JIM! but the master of spinnnn a un realist will try !  but if you talk to him tell him there is a job with bush and co just for him!      spinnnnnnnn liessss

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Guest Local Finance Consultant
Stop the nonsense, Jimbo! You know, or at least should know, very well how the process goes.

Of course the introduced budget is a real representation of the anticipated expenses/revenues. But like any budget, it is subject to and susceptible to change UNTIL IT IS ADOPTED. You are incorrect in stating that the awarding of Extraordinary/Discretionary Aid precludes budget changes. The very award itself changes the budget; and the amount of the award determines what, if any, other changes should be made. How could a town possibly do the budget offsets until AFTER the amount of the aid is known. I believe you may be confusing Extraordinary Aid with Aid to Distressed Cities which limits the budgetary powers of the municipalities that accept it. (Shouldn't you know the difference?)

I think you'll find that a considerable reduction was realized in the prior budget when the Town, after intense scrutiny, exercised the option to delay hiring in the police and fire departments until mid budget cycle even though those departments had included the "hires" in the budget for the entire fiscal year. I'm sure that if I had the time to go through and compare the introduced budget to the adopted budget, I could find many others. And I don't mean the few dollars you wanted to shave from Meals on Wheels.

Interesting exchange about local budgeting. Must admit I was somewhat surprised to find that Mr. Mangin is a finance officer at some level for a local town, East Newark (?). Not familiar with some of the references here but I have to agree with Mr. Realist on the flexibility of the introduced budget versus the adopted budget. Mr. Mangin's quote that you can't change a budget after extraordinary aid is just plain wrong. Amendments can be made before adoption with or w/o public hearing depending on the type and scope of the change. I would have to check the statute for all the public hearing criteria but for instance one would be a 10% change in appropriation or over 1% change in overall revenue. Haven't worked with municipal budgets in a while so am not sure of all reasons to hold public hearings to amend a budget. In some special cases a budget can even be changed after adoption and then be presented for re-adoption if the state ok's it.

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Stop the nonsense, Jimbo! You know, or at least should know, very well how the process goes.

Of course the introduced budget is a real representation of the anticipated expenses/revenues. But like any budget, it is subject to and susceptible to change UNTIL IT IS ADOPTED. You are incorrect in stating that the awarding of Extraordinary/Discretionary Aid precludes budget changes. The very award itself changes the budget; and the amount of the award determines what, if any, other changes should be made. How could a town possibly do the budget offsets until AFTER the amount of the aid is known. I believe you may be confusing Extraordinary Aid with Aid to Distressed Cities which limits the budgetary powers of the municipalities that accept it. (Shouldn't you know the difference?)

No comment on this, Jim? I guess you haven't had sufficient time to create your "what I really meant was" reply.

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You are incorrect in stating that the awarding of Extraordinary/Discretionary Aid precludes budget changes. The very award itself changes the budget; and the amount of the award determines what, if any, other changes should be made. How could a town possibly do the budget offsets until AFTER the amount of the aid is known. I believe you may be confusing Extraordinary Aid with Aid to Distressed Cities which limits the budgetary powers of the municipalities that accept it. (Shouldn't you know the difference?)

I am really getting tired of proving you wrong all the time. Do you know anything about the Extraordinary Aid Program? You CANNOT change your budget after receiving Extraordinary Aid. Period. If you want to ammend your budget before you receive the aid, you have to get permission from the Division of Local Government Services.

You say you always admit when you're wrong. Will you admit it this time?

Still not convinced? Click here if you don't believe me.

Who am I kidding? You won't admit you're wrong. You won't even click on the link to find out you're wrong. Here's the quote from the State's website regarding the Extraordinary Aid Program:

This means that after Extraordinary Aid grants have been announced, no successful applicant shall be permitted to make material increases or decreases to budgeted revenues or appropriations. Therefore, any applicant that plans to make changes to the introduced budget after their aid application has been submitted should submit those changes to the Division so that it can be part of the application review process.

Any change to the budget has to be made before the award is granted, or those changes have to be considered before the award is granted. You say Santos & Co. presented this budget "warts and all, to make the best possible case for state aid." You're wrong again. Admit it.

Or stick to cheerleading.

Jim Mangin

ps - And what no comment on my $400,000 reduction of the tax levy? C'mon now. You can think of something. I told you folks he would start spinning.

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Interesting exchange about local budgeting.  Must admit I was somewhat surprised to find that Mr. Mangin is a finance officer at some level for a local town, East Newark (?).  Not familiar with some of the references here but I have to agree with Mr. Realist on the flexibility of the introduced budget versus the adopted budget.  Mr. Mangin's quote that you can't change a budget after extraordinary aid is just plain wrong.  Amendments can be made before adoption with or w/o public hearing depending on the type and scope of the change.  I would have to check the statute for all the public hearing criteria but for instance one would be a 10% change in appropriation or over 1% change in overall revenue.  Haven't worked with municipal budgets in a while so am not sure of all reasons to hold public hearings to amend a budget.  In some special cases a budget can even be changed after adoption and then be presented for re-adoption if the state ok's it.

If you "haven't worked with municipal budgets in a while" and you readily admit you are "not familiar with some of the references here," I have to ask - why would you agree with this guy? At the very least, ask me to prove my point to you. I'll do it. Happily.

Try to keep an open mind. That's all I ask.

Jim Mangin

ps - You mentioned the criteria for a public hearing on a budget ammendment. It's known as the "1-10-5 Rule." You need a public hearing on a budget ammendment if it:

- adds a new appropriation in excess of 1% of total appropriations, or

- increases or decreases any appropriation item by more than 10%, or

- increases the amount to be raised by taxation more than 5%.

I hope this helps.

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