Jump to content

POSSIBLE pension reforms


Guest EBENEZZER
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest EBENEZZER

Governor Christie and lawmakers of both parties will unveil a series of sweeping pension and benefit reforms Monday that could affect every public employee in New Jersey while saving the state billions of dollars, according to four officials with direct knowledge of the plan.

The proposals would require workers and retirees at all levels of government and local school districts to contribute to their own health care costs, ban part-time workers at the state and local levels from participating in the underfunded state pension system, cap sick-leave payouts for all public employees and constitutionally require the state to fully fund its pension obligations each year.

Details of the four-bill package to be introduced Monday were provided on the condition of anonymity because the four officials were not authorized to speak in advance.

The proposals go further than several past efforts at reining in taxpayer-funded pension and benefit costs, and if enacted would represent a major early victory for the new Republican governor and Democrats who control the state Legislature. But supporters anticipate an angry response from public employee and teachers unions that wield considerable power throughout the state — though lawmakers argue rank-and-file workers would have safer pensions than before.

Christie's office declined to comment, as did top Democrats and Republicans involved in crafting the bills.

All sides had made their feelings clear last month, when Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, announced the upper house's intentions to fix a system that would otherwise "go bankrupt." Lawmakers of both parties pledged their support, with Christie saying "bipartisan action is critical to reforming a broken pension and benefits system."

Hetty Rosenstein, a state director of the Communications Workers of America, which represents 60,000 state and local workers, said she was still studying the bills but believes the reforms are misguided.

For most rank-and-file employees, benefits are "not extremely lucrative. … They are not out-of-whack," Rosenstein said Saturday. "This interferes with the collective bargaining relationship and it's not going to save any kind of significant money."

Steve Baker, spokesman for the 200,000-member New Jersey Education Association, said Saturday the teachers union is still reviewing the bills and had no immediate comment.

The state pension system, which includes accounts covering more than 700,000 working and retired state, county and municipal employees and teachers, was underfunded by about $34 billion as of the last official count in 2008. Retired workers and beneficiaries receive a total of $6.1 billion a year. Health insurance costs have also skyrocketed of late, with a 2009 study projecting health care would cost $1.78 billion for state workers and retirees this year. For local employers in the state plan, costs were expected to hit $856 million, and for school districts, $1.84 billion.

"Unless we take action now, New Jersey's pension system will implode, leaving thousands of rank and file workers penniless in retirement," Sweeney, an ironworkers union leader who has clashed with public employee unions, said in his announcement. There are 467,872 current public employees enrolled in the retirement systems.

The four officials could not provide a formal estimate of the savings, but said the amount would reach billions over the next decade. The reforms to be proposed Monday include:

* Requiring all current public employees to contribute at least 1.5 percent of their annual salaries toward their health benefits, and all future retirees to contribute at least 1.5 percent of their base pension to their health benefits. State employees were required to contribute at that rate beginning in 2007 under then-Gov. Jon Corzine, but many local governments and school districts do not require any health care contributions. The minimum threshold would be incorporated into upcoming local contracts, and governing bodies could try to negotiate it higher.

* Offering for voter approval a constitutional amendment forcing the state to fully fund its pension obligations in each year's budget. While the requirement would not yet be in effect, a full payment for the upcoming budget would be about $2 billion out of a budget in the $28 billion range. Payments have dwindled to cope with budget woes, including Corzine eliminating this fiscal year's contribution entirely. Corzine also allowed local governments last year to postpone part of their pension payments, arguing that covering the full cost would drive up property taxes in a recession.

* Changing how pension payments are calculated, and who qualifies for a pension, for future employees at all levels of government. That includes repealing a 9 percent increase in benefits put in place in 2001, factoring in the highest five years of salary instead of three years to determine pension payouts, and banning part-time workers from participating in the pension system. State employees would have to work 35 hours a week and local employees 32 hours a week to qualify.

* Enrolling future part-time employees at all levels of government in a defined-contribution plan instead, and raising the minimum annual pay to participate to $5,000 from $1,500. Current part-timers would continue in the pension system as long as they remain continuously employed.

* Capping payouts for unused sick leave at $15,000 for all public employees, mirroring the limit already in place at the state level, and limiting stored vacation time. Retirement packages have sparked taxpayer outrage, including a 2008 deal to give a former Keansburg superintendent $740,000 in severance pay, including $184,586 for unused sick leave.

Many of the concepts were put forward in 2006 during a special legislative session on reducing property taxes, and pushed since then by Sweeney and Sens. Barbara Buono, D-Middlesex, Nicholas Scutari, D-Union, Kevin O'Toole, R-Essex, and others. But lawmakers said Corzine stymied efforts.

Unions have long pushed for the state to cover its pension obligations. But groups wary of the new governor — especially the New Jersey Education Association teachers union — have already voiced strong resistance to some of Christie's ideas on the basis that they interfere with the collective bargaining process.

from The Star-Ledger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Governor Christie and lawmakers of both parties will unveil a series of sweeping pension and benefit reforms Monday that could affect every public employee in New Jersey while saving the state billions of dollars, according to four officials with direct knowledge of the plan.

The proposals would require workers and retirees at all levels of government and local school districts to contribute to their own health care costs, ban part-time workers at the state and local levels from participating in the underfunded state pension system, cap sick-leave payouts for all public employees and constitutionally require the state to fully fund its pension obligations each year.

Details of the four-bill package to be introduced Monday were provided on the condition of anonymity because the four officials were not authorized to speak in advance.

The proposals go further than several past efforts at reining in taxpayer-funded pension and benefit costs, and if enacted would represent a major early victory for the new Republican governor and Democrats who control the state Legislature. But supporters anticipate an angry response from public employee and teachers unions that wield considerable power throughout the state — though lawmakers argue rank-and-file workers would have safer pensions than before.

Christie's office declined to comment, as did top Democrats and Republicans involved in crafting the bills.

All sides had made their feelings clear last month, when Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, announced the upper house's intentions to fix a system that would otherwise "go bankrupt." Lawmakers of both parties pledged their support, with Christie saying "bipartisan action is critical to reforming a broken pension and benefits system."

Hetty Rosenstein, a state director of the Communications Workers of America, which represents 60,000 state and local workers, said she was still studying the bills but believes the reforms are misguided.

For most rank-and-file employees, benefits are "not extremely lucrative. … They are not out-of-whack," Rosenstein said Saturday. "This interferes with the collective bargaining relationship and it's not going to save any kind of significant money."

Steve Baker, spokesman for the 200,000-member New Jersey Education Association, said Saturday the teachers union is still reviewing the bills and had no immediate comment.

The state pension system, which includes accounts covering more than 700,000 working and retired state, county and municipal employees and teachers, was underfunded by about $34 billion as of the last official count in 2008. Retired workers and beneficiaries receive a total of $6.1 billion a year. Health insurance costs have also skyrocketed of late, with a 2009 study projecting health care would cost $1.78 billion for state workers and retirees this year. For local employers in the state plan, costs were expected to hit $856 million, and for school districts, $1.84 billion.

"Unless we take action now, New Jersey's pension system will implode, leaving thousands of rank and file workers penniless in retirement," Sweeney, an ironworkers union leader who has clashed with public employee unions, said in his announcement. There are 467,872 current public employees enrolled in the retirement systems.

The four officials could not provide a formal estimate of the savings, but said the amount would reach billions over the next decade. The reforms to be proposed Monday include:

* Requiring all current public employees to contribute at least 1.5 percent of their annual salaries toward their health benefits, and all future retirees to contribute at least 1.5 percent of their base pension to their health benefits. State employees were required to contribute at that rate beginning in 2007 under then-Gov. Jon Corzine, but many local governments and school districts do not require any health care contributions. The minimum threshold would be incorporated into upcoming local contracts, and governing bodies could try to negotiate it higher.

* Offering for voter approval a constitutional amendment forcing the state to fully fund its pension obligations in each year's budget. While the requirement would not yet be in effect, a full payment for the upcoming budget would be about $2 billion out of a budget in the $28 billion range. Payments have dwindled to cope with budget woes, including Corzine eliminating this fiscal year's contribution entirely. Corzine also allowed local governments last year to postpone part of their pension payments, arguing that covering the full cost would drive up property taxes in a recession.

* Changing how pension payments are calculated, and who qualifies for a pension, for future employees at all levels of government. That includes repealing a 9 percent increase in benefits put in place in 2001, factoring in the highest five years of salary instead of three years to determine pension payouts, and banning part-time workers from participating in the pension system. State employees would have to work 35 hours a week and local employees 32 hours a week to qualify.

* Enrolling future part-time employees at all levels of government in a defined-contribution plan instead, and raising the minimum annual pay to participate to $5,000 from $1,500. Current part-timers would continue in the pension system as long as they remain continuously employed.

* Capping payouts for unused sick leave at $15,000 for all public employees, mirroring the limit already in place at the state level, and limiting stored vacation time. Retirement packages have sparked taxpayer outrage, including a 2008 deal to give a former Keansburg superintendent $740,000 in severance pay, including $184,586 for unused sick leave.

Many of the concepts were put forward in 2006 during a special legislative session on reducing property taxes, and pushed since then by Sweeney and Sens. Barbara Buono, D-Middlesex, Nicholas Scutari, D-Union, Kevin O'Toole, R-Essex, and others. But lawmakers said Corzine stymied efforts.

Unions have long pushed for the state to cover its pension obligations. But groups wary of the new governor — especially the New Jersey Education Association teachers union — have already voiced strong resistance to some of Christie's ideas on the basis that they interfere with the collective bargaining process.

from The Star-Ledger

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Governor Christie and lawmakers of both parties will unveil a series of sweeping pension and benefit reforms Monday that could affect every public employee in New Jersey while saving the state billions of dollars, according to four officials with direct knowledge of the plan.

The proposals would require workers and retirees at all levels of government and local school districts to contribute to their own health care costs, ban part-time workers at the state and local levels from participating in the underfunded state pension system, cap sick-leave payouts for all public employees and constitutionally require the state to fully fund its pension obligations each year.

Details of the four-bill package to be introduced Monday were provided on the condition of anonymity because the four officials were not authorized to speak in advance.

The proposals go further than several past efforts at reining in taxpayer-funded pension and benefit costs, and if enacted would represent a major early victory for the new Republican governor and Democrats who control the state Legislature. But supporters anticipate an angry response from public employee and teachers unions that wield considerable power throughout the state — though lawmakers argue rank-and-file workers would have safer pensions than before.

Christie's office declined to comment, as did top Democrats and Republicans involved in crafting the bills.

All sides had made their feelings clear last month, when Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, announced the upper house's intentions to fix a system that would otherwise "go bankrupt." Lawmakers of both parties pledged their support, with Christie saying "bipartisan action is critical to reforming a broken pension and benefits system."

Hetty Rosenstein, a state director of the Communications Workers of America, which represents 60,000 state and local workers, said she was still studying the bills but believes the reforms are misguided.

For most rank-and-file employees, benefits are "not extremely lucrative. … They are not out-of-whack," Rosenstein said Saturday. "This interferes with the collective bargaining relationship and it's not going to save any kind of significant money."

Steve Baker, spokesman for the 200,000-member New Jersey Education Association, said Saturday the teachers union is still reviewing the bills and had no immediate comment.

The state pension system, which includes accounts covering more than 700,000 working and retired state, county and municipal employees and teachers, was underfunded by about $34 billion as of the last official count in 2008. Retired workers and beneficiaries receive a total of $6.1 billion a year. Health insurance costs have also skyrocketed of late, with a 2009 study projecting health care would cost $1.78 billion for state workers and retirees this year. For local employers in the state plan, costs were expected to hit $856 million, and for school districts, $1.84 billion.

"Unless we take action now, New Jersey's pension system will implode, leaving thousands of rank and file workers penniless in retirement," Sweeney, an ironworkers union leader who has clashed with public employee unions, said in his announcement. There are 467,872 current public employees enrolled in the retirement systems.

The four officials could not provide a formal estimate of the savings, but said the amount would reach billions over the next decade. The reforms to be proposed Monday include:

* Requiring all current public employees to contribute at least 1.5 percent of their annual salaries toward their health benefits, and all future retirees to contribute at least 1.5 percent of their base pension to their health benefits. State employees were required to contribute at that rate beginning in 2007 under then-Gov. Jon Corzine, but many local governments and school districts do not require any health care contributions. The minimum threshold would be incorporated into upcoming local contracts, and governing bodies could try to negotiate it higher.

* Offering for voter approval a constitutional amendment forcing the state to fully fund its pension obligations in each year's budget. While the requirement would not yet be in effect, a full payment for the upcoming budget would be about $2 billion out of a budget in the $28 billion range. Payments have dwindled to cope with budget woes, including Corzine eliminating this fiscal year's contribution entirely. Corzine also allowed local governments last year to postpone part of their pension payments, arguing that covering the full cost would drive up property taxes in a recession.

* Changing how pension payments are calculated, and who qualifies for a pension, for future employees at all levels of government. That includes repealing a 9 percent increase in benefits put in place in 2001, factoring in the highest five years of salary instead of three years to determine pension payouts, and banning part-time workers from participating in the pension system. State employees would have to work 35 hours a week and local employees 32 hours a week to qualify.

* Enrolling future part-time employees at all levels of government in a defined-contribution plan instead, and raising the minimum annual pay to participate to $5,000 from $1,500. Current part-timers would continue in the pension system as long as they remain continuously employed.

* Capping payouts for unused sick leave at $15,000 for all public employees, mirroring the limit already in place at the state level, and limiting stored vacation time. Retirement packages have sparked taxpayer outrage, including a 2008 deal to give a former Keansburg superintendent $740,000 in severance pay, including $184,586 for unused sick leave.

Many of the concepts were put forward in 2006 during a special legislative session on reducing property taxes, and pushed since then by Sweeney and Sens. Barbara Buono, D-Middlesex, Nicholas Scutari, D-Union, Kevin O'Toole, R-Essex, and others. But lawmakers said Corzine stymied efforts.

Unions have long pushed for the state to cover its pension obligations. But groups wary of the new governor — especially the New Jersey Education Association teachers union — have already voiced strong resistance to some of Christie's ideas on the basis that they interfere with the collective bargaining process.

from The Star-Ledger

That's correct .Blame the teachers,as usual.

The real abuses in the system have been by the politicians,lawyers,and multi job holders .The teachers have been Paying into the system at the rate 5.5% every paycheck.Thanks to Governor Whitman and the people who followed her in that office,the pension fund has been not funded or under funded.At one time the pension fund was well over 100%.It became a cash cow for anyone who could dip into it .Meanwhile the contributers who paid into it year after year were being stolen from.

Sure there have been excesses on the part of some higher ups in the teaching ranks but the every day worker who might have spent 100's of thousands to get master degrees and beyond,Those who swapped higher salaries in the private sector for the promise of a pension when they retired and health benefits are now been told we're going to change the rules and you're double screwed.We just moved the goalposts.One Christie was a thief ,this one's a bully

Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW you pay 5.5%?? The Police and Fire Depts. pay 8.5% thats right 8.5% I agree with you that the pension funds have been raided by these POLITICAL SCUM$AGS.. But there is a ton of waste in the SCHOOL SYSTEM!!!!! and of course all of the crazy NEPOTISM of the NEW hirings there....Lets get real and when you start paying the other 3% like I do, Stop complaining.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's correct .Blame the teachers,as usual.

The real abuses in the system have been by the politicians,lawyers,and multi job holders .The teachers have been Paying into the system at the rate 5.5% every paycheck.Thanks to Governor Whitman and the people who followed her in that office,the pension fund has been not funded or under funded.At one time the pension fund was well over 100%.It became a cash cow for anyone who could dip into it .Meanwhile the contributers who paid into it year after year were being stolen from.

Sure there have been excesses on the part of some higher ups in the teaching ranks but the every day worker who might have spent 100's of thousands to get master degrees and beyond,Those who swapped higher salaries in the private sector for the promise of a pension when they retired and health benefits are now been told we're going to change the rules and you're double screwed.We just moved the goalposts.One Christie was a thief ,this one's a bully

you my friend are 100% correct, the every day worker is the one getting screwed, but please do not blame Christie blame those former Governors who were spending and dipping into it for others and other high paying jobs like the Superintendents and such. Christie is only trying to rectify the problem we have here in Jersey, we are in the hole and he inherited this big problem. BLAME THE PREVIOUS THIEVES THAT ONLY CARED ABOUT THE POWER AND POLITICS, NOT THE PEOPLE. Just like everyone is blaming our President Mr. Obama inherited many broken systems, now its time to fix them, Obama and Christie cannot do it alone and cannot fix it in a year. Patience, peace and the fact that you have a job right now should be reason to be at confort. PEACE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest BlueTideBacker
you my friend are 100% correct, the every day worker is the one getting screwed, but please do not blame Christie blame those former Governors who were spending and dipping into it for others and other high paying jobs like the Superintendents and such. Christie is only trying to rectify the problem we have here in Jersey, we are in the hole and he inherited this big problem. BLAME THE PREVIOUS THIEVES THAT ONLY CARED ABOUT THE POWER AND POLITICS, NOT THE PEOPLE. Just like everyone is blaming our President Mr. Obama inherited many broken systems, now its time to fix them, Obama and Christie cannot do it alone and cannot fix it in a year. Patience, peace and the fact that you have a job right now should be reason to be at confort. PEACE

Don't include our inept socialist president with our Republican Governor Christie. It's the previous tax & spend democrats that have gotten us into the mess we're in.

Yes, Christie will do his best to save NJ while the community organizer will do his best to drive us into bankruptcy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its funny you the teacher say you pay 5.5% to your pension... I pay 8.5% as a police officer.. The police and fire pension has also been drained by these political hacks.. So until you start contributing what we do shut your mouth... Can not wait for Christie to make the cuts in the Schools and to their budgets..... So get ready and stop complaining... How did you get your job???? Know someone??? or is it the Harrison Way??? NEPOTISM!!!!!!!!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its funny you the teacher say you pay 5.5% to your pension... I pay 8.5% as a police officer.. The police and fire pension has also been drained by these political hacks.. So until you start contributing what we do shut your mouth... Can not wait for Christie to make the cuts in the Schools and to their budgets..... So get ready and stop complaining... How did you get your job???? Know someone??? or is it the Harrison Way??? NEPOTISM!!!!!!!!!!!

You also can retire sooner at a greater percentage of your salary.You also don't have to have a college degree and a teacher certification to get your job.You don't have to continue to get degrees to increase your salary .You get to take a civil service exam.

No one was comparing the police with the teachers.It's apples and oranges.Both provide necessary services.

Whoever you are ,though, you continue to perpetuate the belief on this site that all the police are miserable, bitter,envious,money-hungy individuals.

Fortunately I know and I am related to enough police officers and I have enough education not to paint everyone in a group with the same broad brush.There's a term in psychology for people who read ,hear or see something and immediately apply it to themselves.I suggest you look it up.

Try and read the letter again without applying it to yourself.It might make it more relevant .Oh yeah rarely do you read teachers,if ever, complaining on this site about what they have.They know when they have it good .Someone just wrote a letter explaining about something that was promised by the State of NJ that was going to be taken away.

I guess the difference is the education

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Harrison Senior
You also can retire sooner at a greater percentage of your salary.You also don't have to have a college degree and a teacher certification to get your job.You don't have to continue to get degrees to increase your salary .You get to take a civil service exam.

No one was comparing the police with the teachers.It's apples and oranges.Both provide necessary services.

Whoever you are ,though, you continue to perpetuate the belief on this site that all the police are miserable, bitter,envious,money-hungy individuals.

Fortunately I know and I am related to enough police officers and I have enough education not to paint everyone in a group with the same broad brush.There's a term in psychology for people who read ,hear or see something and immediately apply it to themselves.I suggest you look it up.

Try and read the letter again without applying it to yourself.It might make it more relevant .Oh yeah rarely do you read teachers,if ever, complaining on this site about what they have.They know when they have it good .Someone just wrote a letter explaining about something that was promised by the State of NJ that was going to be taken away.

I guess the difference is the education

Barney just got his butt whipped.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't include our inept socialist president with our Republican Governor Christie. It's the previous tax & spend democrats that have gotten us into the mess we're in.

Yes, Christie will do his best to save NJ while the community organizer will do his best to drive us into bankruptcy.

youse forget about that other popular politcal hack - former gov CHRISTIE Todd Whitman. helpful she was.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Requiring all current public employees to contribute at least 1.5 percent of their annual salaries toward their health benefits, and all future retirees to contribute at least 1.5 percent of their base pension to their health benefits. State employees were required to contribute at that rate beginning in 2007 under then-Gov. "

I have a problem with this part of the reform.. Why 1.5%? it makes no sense...Im a police officer and my salary is 98k a year, Captains are at around 150k a year, it costs the same amount of money to insure both of us, so why would he have to pay more money then I would? if it costs 8k a year to cover someone, then the employee should have to pay a percentage of that amount ...making it 1.5% of your salary is another way of saying a TAX.So its not bad enough we have the highest taxes in jersey, they are basically adding another 1.5% on top of the rest.

Now i will be the last person to say teachers get too much pay , sick time ect..because i feel good for them, if they faught for the contract and got a good one. I do have a problem with the education system in general.

Why do we need school boards in every town? Do we really need 500 school boards? Are the people on these boards collecting pensions? I know where i live, the super of the school district makes like 200k a year. I think the schools should be ran by each county and have a super intendant of schools in each county...it would save a ton of money because you would have 12 instead of 500 people running things..i feel thats one small way of helping to cut costs without taking away from teachers who already have a contract.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im Not jealous at all, I'm just stating the obvious.... I think you know what this is all about the pension thing is a 3% difference start paying it and you would complain also.... As far as the teachers and the board of ed, I was stating that the town thinks they can shift jobs to the schools and get away with it... They do not want to lay off there friends(NEPOTISM)..... You have to agree with me though, Some of the teachers in the schools are a joke with lack of education..... As an alumni of HHS I wish I went to a better school... The newer teachers now seem to lack the knowledge and are just collecting a check!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Im Not jealous at all, I'm just stating the obvious.... I think you know what this is all about the pension thing is a 3% difference start paying it and you would complain also.... As far as the teachers and the board of ed, I was stating that the town thinks they can shift jobs to the schools and get away with it... They do not want to lay off there friends(NEPOTISM)..... You have to agree with me though, Some of the teachers in the schools are a joke with lack of education..... As an alumni of HHS I wish I went to a better school... The newer teachers now seem to lack the knowledge and are just collecting a check!!!!

1.Do you pay into social security? NO!!

2.You can retire after 20 years at what %?? Teachers have to work much,much longer!

3.You may have a point about the town shifting people to BOE payroll .It really sounds if you have someone inparticular in mind

4.Nepotism...not friends,relatives ..break out that Funk and Wagnells you never used in H.S.

5.No,I don't agree with the lack of education thing.Contrary to the police you must have a degree and state certification to get a teaching job.You must be evaluated every year.Many times before you receive tenure.Some ones slip through the cracks.But there are bad cops ,fireman,bartenders,governors.

6.I wish you went to a better school because you're reading and writing,spelling are an embarrassment to Harrison High School.A school, mind you,that has produced doctors,lawyers,accountants,stockbrockers,musicians,actors,college professors,collegiate coaches among others.The question is what happened to you??? We didn"t apply ourselves? Do you remember Shakespeare's Julius Caesar,"The fault, dear Brutus ,is not in the stars but in ourselves." You were probably absent that day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1. Ok, We do not pay into Social Security but I have enough quarters to collect it so I paid my share!!!!

2. It's 25 years and we receive 65% and full benefits!!!!

3. I think it is obvious with the 5-8 that changed job titles.

4. Oh it is nepotism!!!!!!!!

5. I do have a degree and I have to get certified also... I will give you credit there are bad in all.

6. That catholic education would of landed me closer to god!!!! maybe I would of went to church more often.

7. I was absent that day but who cares I make 95k to do whatever I want!!!!!!!!!!!

GET A LIFE!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1. Ok, We do not pay into Social Security but I have enough quarters to collect it so I paid my share!!!!

2. It's 25 years and we receive 65% and full benefits!!!!

3. I think it is obvious with the 5-8 that changed job titles.

4. Oh it is nepotism!!!!!!!!

5. I do have a degree and I have to get certified also... I will give you credit there are bad in all.

6. That catholic education would of landed me closer to god!!!! maybe I would of went to church more often.

7. I was absent that day but who cares I make 95k to do whatever I want!!!!!!!!!!!

GET A LIFE!!

I guess you weren't on the debating team.Thanks for proving my point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1.Do you pay into social security? NO!!

2.You can retire after 20 years at what %?? Teachers have to work much,much longer!

3.You may have a point about the town shifting people to BOE payroll .It really sounds if you have someone inparticular in mind

4.Nepotism...not friends,relatives ..break out that Funk and Wagnells you never used in H.S.

5.No,I don't agree with the lack of education thing.Contrary to the police you must have a degree and state certification to get a teaching job.You must be evaluated every year.Many times before you receive tenure.Some ones slip through the cracks.But there are bad cops ,fireman,bartenders,governors.

6.I wish you went to a better school because you're reading and writing,spelling are an embarrassment to Harrison High School.A school, mind you,that has produced doctors,lawyers,accountants,stockbrockers,musicians,actors,college professors,collegiate coaches among others.The question is what happened to you??? We didn"t apply ourselves? Do you remember Shakespeare's Julius Caesar,"The fault, dear Brutus ,is not in the stars but in ourselves." You were probably absent that day.

Screw you all! I don't care whether you are a Policeman, fireman, teacher or a clerk, you all make too much money and you all get too much in benefits and give nothing back to the community! So screw you all! I hope 50% of the town workers get laid off and the ret have a salary reduction and have to pay 50% towards thier benefits just like the rest of the world!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LEROY TO GUESS WHO?????? (CHRIS) aka fatboy

He got less than a majority vote which means at least 51% of the public didn't want him for governor. He brings in a bus full of lawyers to run the place. He bypasses the legislature and issues 14 executive orders as though we are all cheering him on.

None of this is going to help his cause. I was hoping he came in and worked WITH those in power. Instead he thinks he is going to prosecute all of them as though he is cleaning up a wild west town. He does have subpoena power... if they don't want to cooperate they don't have too. Gulags are not allowed in New Jersey MR. Prosecutor.

This kind of start is going to make him a do-nothing governor. No one likes him to begin with and then he starts by making enemies. Hold on to your wallet, his cuts are going to make your property taxes go higher. I guarantee by July the government is shut down and the budget includes major tax hikes. By September his aproval rating will be super low and a recall will be the big discussion.confrontational politics don't work. POLITICS ARE THE ART OF COMPROMISE.

This guy blew his chances already.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest BlueTideBacker
LEROY TO GUESS WHO?????? (CHRIS) aka fatboy

He got less than a majority vote which means at least 51% of the public didn't want him for governor. He brings in a bus full of lawyers to run the place. He bypasses the legislature and issues 14 executive orders as though we are all cheering him on.

None of this is going to help his cause. I was hoping he came in and worked WITH those in power. Instead he thinks he is going to prosecute all of them as though he is cleaning up a wild west town. He does have subpoena power... if they don't want to cooperate they don't have too. Gulags are not allowed in New Jersey MR. Prosecutor.

This kind of start is going to make him a do-nothing governor. No one likes him to begin with and then he starts by making enemies. Hold on to your wallet, his cuts are going to make your property taxes go higher. I guarantee by July the government is shut down and the budget includes major tax hikes. By September his aproval rating will be super low and a recall will be the big discussion.confrontational politics don't work. POLITICS ARE THE ART OF COMPROMISE.

This guy blew his chances already.

You're a moron. Christie got elected because NJ couldn't absorb any more debt. He's exactly what we need to make the hard choices that must be made. Let me guess, you're a cop that's going to lose your golden parachute of 300 sick and vacation days you saved, hoping to cash them in at today's rate, not what they were worth when you earned them. The days of wine and roses are over, there's a new sheriff in town.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're a moron. Christie got elected because NJ couldn't absorb any more debt. He's exactly what we need to make the hard choices that must be made. Let me guess, you're a cop that's going to lose your golden parachute of 300 sick and vacation days you saved, hoping to cash them in at today's rate, not what they were worth when you earned them. The days of wine and roses are over, there's a new sheriff in town.

TAX THE RICH BLUE TIDEBACKER

ON THOSE MAKING 125K OR MORE,

HOW ABOUT A 55% TAX RATE ON ANYTHING ABOVE HERE.

NO BREAKS LIKE FATTY WANTS TO GIVE THEM.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unused "sick days" were never supposed to be used up, or have any cash value for faculty members at State Colleges and Universities.

Faculty members only work ten hours a week, on two or three days, for 32 weeks a year -- so it was assumed that they had plenty of time to get sick without having to get sick on one of their sick days.

For example: the former president of NJCU, retired in 1994 -- and was immediately rehired as a full-professor (president emeritus). He began collecting his pension, as well as his professor's salary (now $126,000).

Three years ago, he got sick, and is still sick. This was supposed to become SS Disability -- but then this guy wouldn't have received pension credit -- for the second pension he will begin collecting after his sick days have run out.

But, his sick days should have run out long ago. But the NJCU Board is authorized to extended "sick leave" -- which it appears to have done in this case.

This convoluted arrangement won't be investigated, because this former president's successor is now a member of Governor Christie's Education Commission; and the current president is also a director (full time) for Provident Savings Bank (Securities). He's made over $1,000,000 in this position over the past tree years.

The current president committed fraud to become president; Christie has been informed about this -- and yet nothing is being done. (full documentation available).

Google "Fraud at New Jersey City University" for full details.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TAX THE RICH BLUE TIDEBACKER

ON THOSE MAKING 125K OR MORE,

HOW ABOUT A 55% TAX RATE ON ANYTHING ABOVE HERE.

NO BREAKS LIKE FATTY WANTS TO GIVE THEM.

BlueTideBacker is right, you are a moron.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TAX THE RICH BLUE TIDEBACKER

ON THOSE MAKING 125K OR MORE,

HOW ABOUT A 55% TAX RATE ON ANYTHING ABOVE HERE.

NO BREAKS LIKE FATTY WANTS TO GIVE THEM.

Why aren't you making more than $125,000? Are you handicapped, or just dumb, or lazy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why aren't you making more than $125,000? Are you handicapped, or just dumb, or lazy?

I don't have a government job like yourself. I have no one to be proud of by myself and my knowledge to get me where I am now. Happy, Healthy, Married, 3 beautiful children, a mortgage a couple of cars and a steady job (in the private sector) to provide for my family. I don't have to kiss anybodys butt, but my wife she takes care of our family. thank you

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest TRICKLE DOWN
Why aren't you making more than $125,000? Are you handicapped, or just dumb, or lazy?

I WANT A CUSHY(POLITICAL) JOB LIKE YOURS. LAZY , HANDICAPPED, DUMB NOT

TODAYS ECONOMY DICTATES.

I WILL WORK RED BULL FOR 8.00 PER HOUR ( MUCHO TRABAJO POCO DINERO ) DID YOU SEE THE LINES DOWN THERE!!!

YOUR MATH

24hrs a day x 365 day a year =8760hours x $8.oo =$70,080 Why aren't you making more than $125,000?

BETTER KISS YOUR BOSSES BROWN EYE IF YOUR ABOVE 125

$8.00 -10.00 A HOUR

this is what your kids will make,YOU FOOL, GET USE TO IT. this country su*ks . AFTER COLLEGE TOO... WHAT JOB..

HAVE YOU CHECKED THE STAR LEDGER LATELY.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I WANT A CUSHY(POLITICAL) JOB LIKE YOURS. LAZY , HANDICAPPED, DUMB NOT

TODAYS ECONOMY DICTATES.

I WILL WORK RED BULL FOR 8.00 PER HOUR ( MUCHO TRABAJO POCO DINERO ) DID YOU SEE THE LINES DOWN THERE!!!

YOUR MATH

24hrs a day x 365 day a year =8760hours x $8.oo =$70,080 Why aren't you making more than $125,000?

BETTER KISS YOUR BOSSES BROWN EYE IF YOUR ABOVE 125

$8.00 -10.00 A HOUR

this is what your kids will make,YOU FOOL, GET USE TO IT. this country su*ks . AFTER COLLEGE TOO... WHAT JOB..

HAVE YOU CHECKED THE STAR LEDGER LATELY.

Oboma will fix it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...