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Guest EX-HARRISONIAN

CHECK THIS OUT!!!!

WILL HARRISON BE NEXT??? I'D SAY SO, THE FEDS AREN'T MESSIN AROUND WITH THE FOOLS WHO THINK THEY ARE BENEATH THE LAW. WHERE ARE YOU MCDUMB?? AND ALL YOUR LITTLE YES-MEN

BAD BOYS, BAD BOYS, WHATCHA GONND DO WHEN THEY COME FOR YOU, BAD BOYS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Former Ocean Twp. mayor gets nearly 5 years in jail

by Jeff Whelan Monday August 27, 2007, 3:05 PM

Saying too many New Jersey politicians seem to be "hellbent on corruption," a federal judge today took the unusual step of rejecting federal prosecutors' pleas for leniency and sentenced the former mayor of Ocean Township to nearly five years in prison.

Terrance Weldon, 59, managed to stay out of prison since pleading guilty to corruption charges nearly five years ago by cooperating with federal prosecutors against his accountant, a local official, a developer and an engineer.

Terrance Weldon, former mayor of Ocean Township, walks into federal court in Newark on Oct. 10, 2002. Federal prosecutors said Weldon's help was substantial, and argued that he should serve less than the 51 to 63 months he faced under federal sentencing guidelines.

But Senior U.S. District Judge William Walls said he was unimpressed with Weldon's cooperation, likening it to Al Capone ratting out his driver.

"He is the kingpin," Walls said. "Weldon is the one who has done the greatest damage."

Walls said he had received letters from members of the public who were outraged that Weldon, who also served as the city manager of Asbury Park, had remained free for so long while he cooperated with the government.

The judge also said that he was amazed that despite the parade of public officials he has sentenced to prison over the years, new corrupt politicians keep winding up before him. He said he hoped - though wasn't necessarily confident - that a stiff sentence for Weldon would act as a deterrent.

"As far as I'm concerned, the commission of such crimes deserve severe punishment," Walls said, adding that people are walking into voting booths to exercise their right to vote and instead electing "thugs" who violate the public trust.

Before Walls denied prosecutors' motion for leniency, Assistant U.S. Attorney Mark McCarren said that doing so would send a message to other potential cooperators that it wasn't worth doing so.

Robert Galantucci, Weldon's attorney, called the sentence "abusive" and hinted at an appeal. Weldon appeared stunned by the sentence and declined to talk to reporters after the hearing in federal district court in Newark.

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[ quote=EX-HARRISONIAN,Aug 27 2007, 02:54 PM]

CHECK THIS OUT!!!!

WILL HARRISON BE NEXT??? I'D SAY SO, THE FEDS AREN'T MESSIN AROUND WITH THE FOOLS WHO THINK THEY ARE BENEATH THE LAW. WHERE ARE YOU MCDUMB?? AND ALL YOUR LITTLE YES-MEN

BAD BOYS, BAD BOYS, WHATCHA GONND DO WHEN THEY COME FOR YOU, BAD BOYS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Former Ocean Twp. mayor gets nearly 5 years in jail

by Jeff Whelan Monday August 27, 2007, 3:05 PM

Saying too many New Jersey politicians seem to be "hellbent on corruption," a federal judge today took the unusual step of rejecting federal prosecutors' pleas for leniency and sentenced the former mayor of Ocean Township to nearly five years in prison.

Terrance Weldon, 59, managed to stay out of prison since pleading guilty to corruption charges nearly five years ago by cooperating with federal prosecutors against his accountant, a local official, a developer and an engineer.

Terrance Weldon, former mayor of Ocean Township, walks into federal court in Newark on Oct. 10, 2002. Federal prosecutors said Weldon's help was substantial, and argued that he should serve less than the 51 to 63 months he faced under federal sentencing guidelines.

But Senior U.S. District Judge William Walls said he was unimpressed with Weldon's cooperation, likening it to Al Capone ratting out his driver.

"He is the kingpin," Walls said. "Weldon is the one who has done the greatest damage."

Walls said he had received letters from members of the public who were outraged that Weldon, who also served as the city manager of Asbury Park, had remained free for so long while he cooperated with the government.

The judge also said that he was amazed that despite the parade of public officials he has sentenced to prison over the years, new corrupt politicians keep winding up before him. He said he hoped - though wasn't necessarily confident - that a stiff sentence for Weldon would act as a deterrent.

"As far as I'm concerned, the commission of such crimes deserve severe punishment," Walls said, adding that people are walking into voting booths to exercise their right to vote and instead electing "thugs" who violate the public trust.

Before Walls denied prosecutors' motion for leniency, Assistant U.S. Attorney Mark McCarren said that doing so would send a message to other potential cooperators that it wasn't worth doing so.

Robert Galantucci, Weldon's attorney, called the sentence "abusive" and hinted at an appeal. Weldon appeared stunned by the sentence and declined to talk to reporters after the hearing in federal district court in Newark.

You a holes with nothing better to do.You post this crap all the time for years now.

still waiting for the shit to hit the fan.

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CHECK THIS OUT!!!!

WILL HARRISON BE NEXT??? I'D SAY SO, THE FEDS AREN'T MESSIN AROUND WITH THE FOOLS WHO THINK THEY ARE BENEATH THE LAW.  WHERE ARE YOU MCDUMB??  AND ALL YOUR LITTLE YES-MEN

BAD BOYS, BAD BOYS, WHATCHA GONND DO WHEN THEY COME FOR YOU, BAD BOYS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Former Ocean Twp. mayor gets nearly 5 years in jail

by Jeff Whelan Monday August 27, 2007, 3:05 PM

Saying too many New Jersey politicians seem to be "hellbent on corruption," a federal judge today took the unusual step of rejecting federal prosecutors' pleas for leniency and sentenced the former mayor of Ocean Township to nearly five years in prison.

Terrance Weldon, 59, managed to stay out of prison since pleading guilty to corruption charges nearly five years ago by cooperating with federal prosecutors against his accountant, a local official, a developer and an engineer.

Terrance Weldon, former mayor of Ocean Township, walks into federal court in Newark on Oct. 10, 2002. Federal prosecutors said Weldon's help was substantial, and argued that he should serve less than the 51 to 63 months he faced under federal sentencing guidelines.

But Senior U.S. District Judge William Walls said he was unimpressed with Weldon's cooperation, likening it to Al Capone ratting out his driver.

"He is the kingpin," Walls said. "Weldon is the one who has done the greatest damage."

Walls said he had received letters from members of the public who were outraged that Weldon, who also served as the city manager of Asbury Park, had remained free for so long while he cooperated with the government.

The judge also said that he was amazed that despite the parade of public officials he has sentenced to prison over the years, new corrupt politicians keep winding up before him. He said he hoped - though wasn't necessarily confident - that a stiff sentence for Weldon would act as a deterrent.

"As far as I'm concerned, the commission of such crimes deserve severe punishment," Walls said, adding that people are walking into voting booths to exercise their right to vote and instead electing "thugs" who violate the public trust.

Before Walls denied prosecutors' motion for leniency, Assistant U.S. Attorney Mark McCarren said that doing so would send a message to other potential cooperators that it wasn't worth doing so.

Robert Galantucci, Weldon's attorney, called the sentence "abusive" and hinted at an appeal. Weldon appeared stunned by the sentence and declined to talk to reporters after the hearing in federal district court in Newark.

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  • 3 weeks later...

U.S. Attorney criticizes Dems on corruption

9/14/2007, 5:47 p.m. ET

By ANGELA DELLI SANTI

The Associated Press

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The U.S. Attorney for New Jersey criticized the governor and other top Democrats Friday for having a double standard on political corruption by allowing two indicted lawmakers to finish their terms but forcing others charged with taking bribes to resign immediately.

"One of the problems in New Jersey is an inconsistency in message from our leaders," U.S. Attorney Christopher Christie, a Republican appointed by President Bush, said in a speech to local business leaders in Trenton. "The principles that they establish (ought to) apply to everyone regardless of party, region of the state or whether they are your friend or your enemy politically."

Asked afterward by reporters if he was referring specifically to the governor, Christie said he was talking about "no one in particular."

The state's top Democrats, including Gov. Jon S. Corzine, called for the resignations of Assemblymen Mims Hackett Jr. and Alfred Steele a day after the two were among 11 public officials charged as part of a federal bribery sting. No such call followed the earlier indictments of Sens. Wayne Bryant and Sharpe James, both of whom face multiple corruption charges.

Christie said the assemblymen were caught on tape bragging about getting envelopes of cash from a federal agent who was posing as an insurance broker offering payoffs in exchange for business deals.

The two Democratic assemblymen resigned Sept. 10, four days after making initial appearances in federal court in Trenton.

Bryant of Lawnside and James of Newark were indicted earlier this year but retain their Senate seats. Both have pleaded not guilty.

While Assemblyman Joseph Cryan, the state Democratic chairman, asked Bryant and James to resign, other top Democrats who demanded that Hackett and Steele resign — Corzine, Senate President Richard J. Codey and Assembly Speaker Joseph Roberts Jr. — never asked Bryant and James to do so.

Unlike Hackett and Steele, neither Bryant nor James was seeking re-election.

"I think the situation with the Assembly folks who were caught on tape taking bribes is a slightly different set of facts," Corzine said Thursday.

His office refused to comment on Christie's assertions Friday. Codey and Roberts were unavailable for comment Friday afternoon.

Christie urged Democrats to adopt a consistent position on lawmakers charged with wrongdoing — either assume they are innocent until proven guilty and allow them to remain in office while the charges are being resolved, or demand their resignation once they've been charged and are under the cloud of suspicion.

"I don't have a position on whether someone should resign or not once they're charged," said Christie. "But you can't do both. You have no credibility on the issue of ethics if you take both positions depending upon who it is that's in the crosshairs."

He said the inconsistency in the Democrats' position is even more stark because Bryant and James have been indicted by a grand jury, while the Hackett and Steele cases are not that far along in the process.

In the wake of the most recent legislative corruption cases, Republicans have demanded Corzine use his authority to force the Legislature into session to enact ethics overhauls.

The governor has refused.

Corzine said he doesn't want the Legislature to debate ethics reforms before the November election in which all 120 legislative seats will be decided.

Copyright 2007 Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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State wants pension money back from Rahway official

The Associated Press

CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) — The state is trying to get pension money back from a Rahway public official who retired from his two public jobs and was collecting his pension while at the same time being paid consulting fees to do the same work.

Peter Pelissier retired from his jobs as Rahway's business administrator and redevelopment director five years ago to a log cabin in Montana.

He began collecting his taxpayer-funded pension the same month he started getting consultant fees from the Rahway Redevelopment Agency to do the same job he left for retirement, The Star-Ledger of Newark reported Monday.

He earned more than $294,000 in consulting fees through an exclusive, no-bid contract approved by the agency while collecting $331,000 in public employee retirement benefits, the newspaper reported.

The state wants the pension money back, arguing Pelissier never left the job as redevelopment director in Rahway.

"If you retire, you cannot ... go back into a position similar to what you were doing when you left government, or another position covered by the pension system," state Treasury spokesman Tom Vincz said. "We're seeking to recoup all benefits paid out."

After Treasury officials notified him his consulting contract violated pension guidelines, Pelissier returned to Rahway in January to take his two old jobs back. He is a salaried employee again, making $260,000 from the two jobs.

Pelissier said he was negotiating with the pension board and declined to discuss the details of his consulting agreements.

"Based on the fact that I'm in the process of discussing this with the board and haven't even solidified what the arrangements would be, I don't have any comment at this time," Pelissier said.

umh....ummmmhhh .very very intresting!!!! Harrisonians.

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Guest Pershing Rifles
Could harrison mismanagement RE -PETE this same mistake.

Can't Peter B. ever step up to the plate and comment on the shit he has pulled over the years, along with the rest of the pillars of the community. I want to see them all led out with their coats over their heads.

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Guest State Watcher
Could harrison mismanagement RE -PETE this same mistake.

We're lucky to have an honest group in power. Pete and Ray would never do anything illegal or dishonorable !

There, is no reason to worry while we have them working for us.

Why do you think the AG isn't in Harrison.

All you complainers stop it and worry about the weather.

State Watcher

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  • 4 weeks later...

Harrison officials being probed by corruption units

Monday, October 22, 2007

BY JEFF WHELAN,

NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE

RICK HEPP AND

JOHN P. MARTIN

Just when every new tale of corruption, ethical lapses or curious decisions by public officials in New Jersey was starting to have that been-there, done-that feeling, along comes Harrison.

A town where the former public works director, saddled with six-figure gambling debts, stole at least $100,000 from the local parking meters.

Where the man who succeeded him was once identified by state prosecutors as a Genovese crime family associate.

Where roughly 50 officials in a square-mile town pull down more than $100,000 a year, three dozen collect two public paychecks and another pockets $210,000 in pension and consulting fees from one of the state's poorest school districts.

And where federal and state investigators have recently trained their sights.

For nearly a year, federal authorities have probed employees, contracts and relationships in Harrison, according to a law enforcement source, two witnesses and defense attorneys, who all said they could not be identified during an ongoing investigation.

The case has involved the New Jersey State Police and public corruption and organized crime units of the U.S. Attorney's Office and FBI, the same sources say.

The town has embarked on plans for thousands of new housing units, retail stores and a 25,000-seat professional soccer stadium.

This summer, William Tanski, the town's former superintendent of public works, pleaded guilty to pilfering $100,000 from Harrison's traffic meters. Hudson County prosecutors said Tanski had a gambling problem. In a petition filed in U.S. bankruptcy court, Tanski had reported $360,000 in debts to four Atlantic City casinos, plus tens of thousands more in credit-card bills.

Tanski was due to be sentenced Friday, but the hearing was postponed - for a third time. He did not return calls and his attorney, Vito Sciancalepore, declined to comment.

Tanski's successor in the $95,000-a-year public works job is Ronald Catrambone, who three times in the 1990s was charged with promoting gambling. In a 1991 indictment, state prosecutors identified him as "Fat Ronnie," an associate in the Genovese crime family. He later accepted a plea bargain that included no jail time.

Last year, Mayor Raymond J. McDonough's campaign gave Catrambone more than $6,600, according to reports filed with the state election commission.

Catrambone said he was unaware of any investigation. Asked about his past arrest record, he hung up.

McDonough did not return messages left Friday at his home and at town hall.

In November, the mayor easily won another four-year term, a part-time job that pays $2,500. A plumber by trade, McDonough earns another $95,000 working at the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission, which also employs a number of other Harrison officials and relatives of town officials.Like McDonough, many have more than one public job. There are more than 50 employees or officials in Harrison's town hall, housing authority or schools who make at least $100,000 a year, from former Mayor Frank Rodgers' grand nephew to McDonough's wife.

State officials are now examining the circumstances behind one of the most fortunate, former councilman Pete Higgins III, who worked for the Harrison schools for a quarter-century. In 2003, on the same day Higgins retired, the district appointed him to a new, $170,000-a-year position to coordinate four construction projects.

"We needed someone to look out for the best interests of the district," Schools Superintendent Anthony Comprelli said.

By law, Higgins couldn't take a second schools job while receiving pension benefits, so Harrison's school board classified his new job as non-educational. That qualified him for pension credits in the separate Public Employees Retirement System, where Higgins already had earned himself a modest pension based on his council tenure. The new job sent Higgins PERS pension swelling to more than $96,000 a year.

When he retired again last year, with only one of the four construction projects finished, Higgins began drawing two pensions worth $182,000. Then the school board hired him again, this time as a consultant at $28,000 a year.

"I don't think the average taxpayer would think that was fair, but I didn't create the situation," Higgins said. "I didn't create these rules."

© 2007 The Jersey Journal

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"I don't think the average taxpayer would think that was fair, but I didn't create the situation," Higgins said. "I didn't create these rules."

how bold and arrogant could you be..... OINK ,OINK ,OINK.

I will say this "pigs always get slaughtered".

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WOW, I am really shocked about this sitituation, :) . I guess the Councilwoman really does live under a rock. What about Dologhan still a Councilman and works for Board at 85K. Now everyone knows why the Cops are bitter, lowest paid in the County and the Departmentheads are some of the top paid. Can only hope this is the tip of the iceberg.

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Guest Miss Crabtree
"I don't think the average taxpayer would think that was fair, but I didn't create the situation," Higgins said. "I didn't create these rules."

how bold and arrogant could you be..... OINK ,OINK ,OINK.

I will say this "pigs always get slaughtered".

70107[/snapback]

;):angry::P:P:P:P:P:)

For Shame...........For Shame

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"I don't think the average taxpayer would think that was fair, but I didn't create the situation," Higgins said. "I didn't create these rules."

how bold and arrogant could you be..... OINK ,OINK ,OINK.

I will say this "pigs always get slaughtered".

70107[/snapback]

How sad is it that this man be allowed to draw $182,000 per year for a pension... when we have one of the poorest districts in the surrounding area... He is a pompous pig, who never cared about our children. All he did was sit there dictate to people and collect a big fat paycheck... just the the rest of these people who were mentioned the the Star Ledger, how in the hell do they determine these salaries??? Certainly not by education, how many of these people making 100k have a college degree??? not many, I'm sure. Do you people wonder why all the good people have moved out of town? that's because they are sick and tired of putting money into these peoples pockets... get real, we need them all gone... IMPEACH MCDUMB, AND ALL HIS CRONIES. By the way, how in the heck did Ronnie Catrambone get a 95k job, with a criminal record???? The Mayor can answer that one for you!!!

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Guest The nerve

I can't believe the nerve of Higgins to make such an idiotic comment! Let's see a hole, if you weren't sitting pretty in that position would you be making the same comment? I have one question, why is that the majority of the people serving on the BOE dont even bother to send their children through the Harrison Public schools..........that alone says a lot about what type of faith they have in the school system!

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Guest Distinguished Alum

The best thing that can happen out of all this is about a dozen arrests and Harrison going under state receivership. We need a top down review of every municipal position and the incumbent's qualifications. HPD, HFD, Harrison Public Schools, the Street department, everyone. This has been going on for decades.

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Guest Person of Faith
"I don't think the average taxpayer would think that was fair, but I didn't create the situation," Higgins said. "I didn't create these rules."

how bold and arrogant could you be..... OINK ,OINK ,OINK.

I will say this "pigs always get slaughtered".

70107[/snapback]

Peter should be aware of the 7 deadly sins, one of which is GREED.

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The best thing that can happen out of all this is about a dozen arrests and Harrison going under state receivership. We need a top down review of every municipal position and the incumbent's qualifications. HPD, HFD, Harrison Public Schools, the Street department, everyone. This has been going on for decades.

70420[/snapback]

It's called an enema

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Guest PETER FITZINTITE
I can't believe the nerve of Higgins to make such an idiotic comment!  Let's see a hole, if you weren't sitting pretty in that position would you be making the same comment?  I have one question, why is that the majority of the people serving on the BOE dont even bother to send their children through the Harrison Public schools..........that alone says a lot about what type of faith they have in the school system!

70197[/snapback]

WHERE DOES STEVIEs angles go to school????

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How sad is it that this man be allowed to draw $182,000 per year for a pension... when we have one of the poorest districts in the surrounding area... He is a pompous pig, who never cared about our children.  All he did was sit there dictate to people and collect a big fat paycheck... just the the rest of these people who were mentioned the the Star Ledger, how in the hell do they determine these salaries???  Certainly not by education, how many of these people making 100k have a college degree??? not many, I'm sure.  Do you people wonder why all the good people have moved out of town?  that's because they are sick and tired of putting money into these peoples pockets...  get real, we need them all gone... IMPEACH MCDUMB, AND ALL HIS CRONIES.  By the way, how in the heck did Ronnie Catrambone get a 95k job, with a criminal record????  The Mayor can answer that one for you!!!

70194[/snapback]

Yeah, BOE members and Super's Office send their kids elsewhere, the proof is in the pudding.

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WHERE DOES STEVIEs angles go to school????

71228[/snapback]

What exactly does this have to do with anything? Are you actualy planning on bad mounthing peoples children? don't go there

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WHERE DOES STEVIEs angles go to school????

71228[/snapback]

Don't think Steve is on the BOE. I'm sure if he were they would have an elected Board of Education and not an appointed by Comprelli and McDonough to all who have no children in the Harrison School System. The only exception ever was Mr. Stahl, and he should be the President of the School Board, all his children attended Harrison schools, so he had the best interest of the kids at hand. That's the way it should be, the people with children should be the ones with most conerns about the school, but no they choose others.... Pathetic.

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