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Bush's farewell address

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Guest Paul

When President Eisenhower left office, he used his farewell address to give us an important warning about the influence of the military-industrial complex. Here was an old soldier, who had been a top General in World War II, sharing his wisdom for the good of the country. It was his valedictory address, his exclamation point, his focus of emphasis.

George W. Bush just delivered his farewell address. Nearly all of it was a lame attempt at self-justification.

I never could stand to look at this bozo. Everything about him said arrogance and unearned privilege. I said eight years ago that he was a spoiled rich kid who didn't understand the world, didn't understand history and had no business anywhere near power. This farewell address was pathetic, and so was this so-called president. Sorry for hyperventilating, but this presidency has been a disgrace.

Mr. Bush, you've done quite enough damage to this country. Just leave.

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Guest mr right
When President Eisenhower left office, he used his farewell address to give us an important warning about the influence of the military-industrial complex. Here was an old soldier, who had been a top General in World War II, sharing his wisdom for the good of the country. It was his valedictory address, his exclamation point, his focus of emphasis.

George W. Bush just delivered his farewell address. Nearly all of it was a lame attempt at self-justification.

I never could stand to look at this bozo. Everything about him said arrogance and unearned privilege. I said eight years ago that he was a spoiled rich kid who didn't understand the world, didn't understand history and had no business anywhere near power. This farewell address was pathetic, and so was this so-called president. Sorry for hyperventilating, but this presidency has been a disgrace.

Mr. Bush, you've done quite enough damage to this country. Just leave.

Paul just go away

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Guest Patriot
When President Eisenhower left office, he used his farewell address to give us an important warning about the influence of the military-industrial complex. Here was an old soldier, who had been a top General in World War II, sharing his wisdom for the good of the country. It was his valedictory address, his exclamation point, his focus of emphasis.

George W. Bush just delivered his farewell address. Nearly all of it was a lame attempt at self-justification.

I never could stand to look at this bozo. Everything about him said arrogance and unearned privilege. I said eight years ago that he was a spoiled rich kid who didn't understand the world, didn't understand history and had no business anywhere near power. This farewell address was pathetic, and so was this so-called president. Sorry for hyperventilating, but this presidency has been a disgrace.

Mr. Bush, you've done quite enough damage to this country. Just leave.

I thought it was an excellent address, highlighted by the fact he's kept America safe since 9/11. You didn't like it because he said "God bless America".

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When President Eisenhower left office, he used his farewell address to give us an important warning about the influence of the military-industrial complex. Here was an old soldier, who had been a top General in World War II, sharing his wisdom for the good of the country. It was his valedictory address, his exclamation point, his focus of emphasis.

George W. Bush just delivered his farewell address. Nearly all of it was a lame attempt at self-justification.

I never could stand to look at this bozo. Everything about him said arrogance and unearned privilege. I said eight years ago that he was a spoiled rich kid who didn't understand the world, didn't understand history and had no business anywhere near power. This farewell address was pathetic, and so was this so-called president. Sorry for hyperventilating, but this presidency has been a disgrace.

Mr. Bush, you've done quite enough damage to this country. Just leave.

Good riddance. I am ashamed to admit I voted for him once. Glad those dark days are over. For me and for America

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Guest Guest
I thought it was an excellent address, highlighted by the fact he's kept America safe since 9/11. You didn't like it because he said "God bless America".

Stupid,

If you have four kids and you get drunk and run one of them over, you don't get credit for not running over the other three.

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Guest Loki
When President Eisenhower left office, he used his farewell address to give us an important warning about the influence of the military-industrial complex. Here was an old soldier, who had been a top General in World War II, sharing his wisdom for the good of the country. It was his valedictory address, his exclamation point, his focus of emphasis.

George W. Bush just delivered his farewell address. Nearly all of it was a lame attempt at self-justification.

I never could stand to look at this bozo. Everything about him said arrogance and unearned privilege. I said eight years ago that he was a spoiled rich kid who didn't understand the world, didn't understand history and had no business anywhere near power. This farewell address was pathetic, and so was this so-called president. Sorry for hyperventilating, but this presidency has been a disgrace.

Mr. Bush, you've done quite enough damage to this country. Just leave.

No surprise here, Paul doesn't like a guy with an "R" next to his name. The guy made mistakes no question, but I believe he did what he felt was right. I hope Obama does turn it around, we all need it. But, I suggest you all read "The Forgotten Man" by Amity Shlaes, the similarities to our response to a coming depression (in the late 20's) and what Obama proposes are striking, if not downright eery.

Stop calling OTHERS arrogant, everything about epitomizes those very attributes, I'M DONE. Never to respond or read this BULLSHIT again.

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Guest 2smart4u
When President Eisenhower left office, he used his farewell address to give us an important warning about the influence of the military-industrial complex. Here was an old soldier, who had been a top General in World War II, sharing his wisdom for the good of the country. It was his valedictory address, his exclamation point, his focus of emphasis.

George W. Bush just delivered his farewell address. Nearly all of it was a lame attempt at self-justification.

I never could stand to look at this bozo. Everything about him said arrogance and unearned privilege. I said eight years ago that he was a spoiled rich kid who didn't understand the world, didn't understand history and had no business anywhere near power. This farewell address was pathetic, and so was this so-called president. Sorry for hyperventilating, but this presidency has been a disgrace.

Mr. Bush, you've done quite enough damage to this country. Just leave.

Doesn't he sound just like a loving "humanist". Make me laugh.

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Now Tsurumi tells us. (Correction - he told us awhile ago) However, quite an indictment.

For 25 years, Yoshi Tsurumi, one of George W. Bush's professors at Harvard Business School, was content with his green-card status as a permanent legal resident of the United States. But Bush's ascension to the presidency in 2001 prompted the Japanese native to secure his American citizenship. The reason: to be able to speak out with the full authority of citizenship about why he believes Bush lacks the character and intellect to lead the world's oldest and most powerful democracy.

"I don't remember all the students in detail unless I'm prompted by something," Tsurumi said in a telephone interview Wednesday. "But I always remember two types of students. One is the very excellent student, the type as a professor you feel honored to be working with. Someone with strong social values, compassion and intellect -- the very rare person you never forget. And then you remember students like George Bush, those who are totally the opposite."

. . .

Harvard Business School's rigorous teaching methods, in which the professor interacts aggressively with students, and students are

encouraged to challenge each other sharply, offered important insights into Bush, Tsurumi said. In observing students' in-class performances, "you develop pretty good ideas about what are their weaknesses and strengths in terms of thinking, analysis, their prejudices, their backgrounds and other things that students reveal," he said.

One of Tsurumi's standout students was Rep. Chris Cox, R-Calif., now the seventh-ranking member of the House Republican leadership. "I typed him as a conservative Republican with a conscience," Tsurumi said. "He never confused his own ideology with economics, and he didn't try to hide his ignorance of a subject in mumbo jumbo. He was what I call a principled conservative." (Though clearly a partisan one. On Wednesday, Cox called for a congressional investigation of the validity of documents that CBS News obtained for a story questioning Bush's attendance at Guard duty in Alabama.)

Bush, by contrast, "was totally the opposite of Chris Cox," Tsurumi said. "He showed pathological lying habits and was in denial when challenged on his prejudices and biases. He would even deny saying something he just said 30 seconds ago. He was famous for that. Students jumped on him; I challenged him." When asked to explain a particular comment, said Tsurumi, Bush would respond, "Oh, I never said that." A White House spokeswoman did not return a phone call seeking comment.

. . .

In 1973, as the oil and energy crisis raged, Tsurumi led a discussion on whether government should assist retirees and other people on fixed incomes with heating costs. Bush, he recalled, "made this ridiculous statement and when I asked him to explain, he said, 'The government doesn't have to help poor people -- because they are lazy.' I said, 'Well, could you explain that assumption?' Not only could he not explain it, he started backtracking on it, saying, 'No, I didn't say that.'"

If Cox had been in the same class, Tsurumi said, "I could have asked him to challenge that and he would have demolished it. Not personally or emotionally, but intellectually."

Sep 16, 2004 | Bush once sneered at Tsurumi for showing the film "The Grapes of Wrath," based on John Steinbeck's novel of the Depression. "We were in a discussion of the New Deal, and he called Franklin Roosevelt's policies 'socialism.' He denounced labor unions, the Securities and Exchange Commission, Medicare, Social Security, you name it. He denounced the civil rights movement as socialism. To him, socialism and communism were the same thing. And when challenged to explain his prejudice, he could not defend his argument, either ideologically, polemically or academically."

Students who challenged and embarrassed Bush in class would then become the subject of a whispering campaign by him, Tsurumi said. "In class, he couldn't challenge them. But after class, he sometimes came up to me in the hallway and started bad-mouthing those students who had challenged him. He would complain that someone was drinking too much. It was innuendo and lies. So that's how I knew, behind his smile and his smirk, that he was a very insecure, cunning and vengeful guy."

Many of Tsurumi's students came from well-connected or wealthy families, but good manners prevented them from boasting about it, the professor said. But Bush seemed unabashed about the connections that had brought him to Harvard. "The other children of the rich and famous were at least well bred to the point of realizing universal values and standards of behavior," Tsurumi said. But Bush sometimes came late to class and often sat in the back row of the theater-like classroom, wearing a bomber jacket from the Texas Air National Guard and spitting chewing tobacco into a cup.

"At first, I wondered, 'Who is this George Bush?' It's a very common name and I didn't know his background. And he was such a bad student that I asked him once how he got in. He said, 'My dad has good friends.'" Bush scored in the lowest 10 percent of the class.

http://dir.salon.com/story/news/feature/20...rumi/print.html

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Guest *Autonomous*
Doesn't he sound just like a loving "humanist". Make me laugh.

After all, we have your shining example of what a loving Christian should sound like!

Shine on, you crazy diamond.

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Guest Guest
Now Tsurumi tells us. (Correction - he told us awhile ago) However, quite an indictment.

Bush, by contrast, "was totally the opposite of Chris Cox," Tsurumi said. "He showed pathological lying habits and was in denial when challenged on his prejudices and biases. He would even deny saying something he just said 30 seconds ago. He was famous for that. Students jumped on him; I challenged him." When asked to explain a particular comment, said Tsurumi, Bush would respond, "Oh, I never said that." A White House spokeswoman did not return a phone call seeking comment.

Sounds like Paszkiewicz.

Sounds like "Patriot".

Hmmmm . . .

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Guest Patriot
After all, we have your shining example of what a loving Christian should sound like!

Shine on, you crazy diamond.

Just curious, do you still have greasy fingers from your days in the motorpool?

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Guest *Autonomous*
Just curious, do you still have greasy fingers from your days in the motorpool?

hur hur dur

D**ba**.

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Guest Lincoln Logger
When President Eisenhower left office, he used his farewell address to give us an important warning about the influence of the military-industrial complex. Here was an old soldier, who had been a top General in World War II, sharing his wisdom for the good of the country. It was his valedictory address, his exclamation point, his focus of emphasis.

George W. Bush just delivered his farewell address. Nearly all of it was a lame attempt at self-justification.

I never could stand to look at this bozo. Everything about him said arrogance and unearned privilege. I said eight years ago that he was a spoiled rich kid who didn't understand the world, didn't understand history and had no business anywhere near power. This farewell address was pathetic, and so was this so-called president. Sorry for hyperventilating, but this presidency has been a disgrace.

Mr. Bush, you've done quite enough damage to this country. Just leave.

Respectfully speaking, you have no right calling yourself an American. No matter how bad you believed this person did, you have no right calling the President of the United States a Bozo. He came into a situation that I would not have wished on any president and today the United States is better off because of his actions. There are other things that this president has done that are even unmentioned but the world is better off because of him. The bill that he signed into AIDS research has curtailed the spread of AIDS worldwide. Yes the world economically has become a nightmare but it is just not because of the actions of one man. The only one looking like a disgrace here again is you. I even am sort of mad that I am spending my time responding to your stupidity again.

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Guest Paul
Respectfully speaking, you have no right calling yourself an American. No matter how bad you believed this person did, you have no right calling the President of the United States a Bozo. He came into a situation that I would not have wished on any president and today the United States is better off because of his actions. There are other things that this president has done that are even unmentioned but the world is better off because of him. The bill that he signed into AIDS research has curtailed the spread of AIDS worldwide. Yes the world economically has become a nightmare but it is just not because of the actions of one man. The only one looking like a disgrace here again is you. I even am sort of mad that I am spending my time responding to your stupidity again.

If you were speaking respectfully, you wouldn't question my right to call myself an American. My right to call someone a bozo doesn't stop just because he becomes president. It's not very professional of me, I suppose, but it gets the point across. But since you've announced your standard, I trust you won't do to President Obama what was done to President Clinton.

As for Mr. Bush, I don't think you appreciate how abysmal his presidency was. You're entitled to think that he just made some mistakes. I think it's worse than that. In his own mind, he may believe that he did right. But he appears to suffer from two fundamental moral failings: an unwillingness to question his own opinions and a lack of concern for people outside his social class. In the church where I received my early moral training, there were no excuses for failings like that. I have let go of the Roman Catholic church's theism, but I've never for a moment suggested that they didn't have a great many things to offer on the subject of morality and ethics. Most Humanists take a similar view of him.

We put people in prison for crimes, even though sometimes their true intent isn't clear. You may not like it or think it appropriate, but I see George W. Bush as being morally as well as intellectually culpable.

As for being a bozo, he has never been intellectually curious. He evades any data that don't suit his purposes. Foreign leaders know it all over the world, and most of the American people know it, too. Most of the world was shocked when we re-elected him. They saw what too many Americans apparently overlooked. A man like that has no business anywhere near power, and we should have known better. Call me arrogant if you want, we the American people dropped the ball, probably because we came to think that we were entitled or destined to sit atop the world without having to work at it. President Obama alluded to that in his inaugural address today.

Bush is out of office now. You're just going to have to live with the fact that that's how I see him.

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Guest Patriot
If you were speaking respectfully, you wouldn't question my right to call myself an American. My right to call someone a bozo doesn't stop just because he becomes president. It's not very professional of me, I suppose, but it gets the point across. But since you've announced your standard, I trust you won't do to President Obama what was done to President Clinton.

As for Mr. Bush, I don't think you appreciate how abysmal his presidency was. You're entitled to think that he just made some mistakes. I think it's worse than that. In his own mind, he may believe that he did right. But he appears to suffer from two fundamental moral failings: an unwillingness to question his own opinions and a lack of concern for people outside his social class. In the church where I received my early moral training, there were no excuses for failings like that. I have let go of the Roman Catholic church's theism, but I've never for a moment suggested that they didn't have a great many things to offer on the subject of morality and ethics. Most Humanists take a similar view of him.

We put people in prison for crimes, even though sometimes their true intent isn't clear. You may not like it or think it appropriate, but I see George W. Bush as being morally as well as intellectually culpable.

As for being a bozo, he has never been intellectually curious. He evades any data that don't suit his purposes. Foreign leaders know it all over the world, and most of the American people know it, too. Most of the world was shocked when we re-elected him. They saw what too many Americans apparently overlooked. A man like that has no business anywhere near power, and we should have known better. Call me arrogant if you want, we the American people dropped the ball, probably because we came to think that we were entitled or destined to sit atop the world without having to work at it. President Obama alluded to that in his inaugural address today.

Aside from being a "bozo", I wonder if Paul will ever acknowledge that George W. Bush saved more lives than any other person in world history? This is not a fact that loony lefties , suffering from Bush Derangement Syndrome (BDS) will easily admit is true. Anyone that doubts the accuracy of this (Paul), should Google "President Bush's AIDS inititive". Bush is responsible for saving over 2 million lives in Sub-Saharan Africa and around the world by spending over 100 billion dollars on anti-viral AIDS drugs. Hardly the actions of a bozo. But let's not forget, Paul is a "Humanist".

Bush is out of office now. You're just going to have to live with the fact that that's how I see him.

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(Patriot)

"Aside from being a "bozo", I wonder if Paul will ever acknowledge that George W. Bush saved more lives than any other person in world history? This is not a fact that loony lefties , suffering from Bush Derangement Syndrome (BDS) will easily admit is true. Anyone that doubts the accuracy of this (Paul), should Google "President Bush's AIDS inititive". Bush is responsible for saving over 2 million lives in Sub-Saharan Africa and around the world by spending over 100 billion dollars on anti-viral AIDS drugs. Hardly the actions of a bozo. But let's not forget, Paul is a "Humanist"."

So Bush did one thing right and helped people in Africa. That's good. Now if only he hadn't destroyed the American economy and gotten us into an unnecessary war.

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Guest Lincoln Logger
If you were speaking respectfully, you wouldn't question my right to call myself an American. My right to call someone a bozo doesn't stop just because he becomes president. It's not very professional of me, I suppose, but it gets the point across. But since you've announced your standard, I trust you won't do to President Obama what was done to President Clinton.

As for Mr. Bush, I don't think you appreciate how abysmal his presidency was. You're entitled to think that he just made some mistakes. I think it's worse than that. In his own mind, he may believe that he did right. But he appears to suffer from two fundamental moral failings: an unwillingness to question his own opinions and a lack of concern for people outside his social class. In the church where I received my early moral training, there were no excuses for failings like that. I have let go of the Roman Catholic church's theism, but I've never for a moment suggested that they didn't have a great many things to offer on the subject of morality and ethics. Most Humanists take a similar view of him.

We put people in prison for crimes, even though sometimes their true intent isn't clear. You may not like it or think it appropriate, but I see George W. Bush as being morally as well as intellectually culpable.

As for being a bozo, he has never been intellectually curious. He evades any data that don't suit his purposes. Foreign leaders know it all over the world, and most of the American people know it, too. Most of the world was shocked when we re-elected him. They saw what too many Americans apparently overlooked. A man like that has no business anywhere near power, and we should have known better. Call me arrogant if you want, we the American people dropped the ball, probably because we came to think that we were entitled or destined to sit atop the world without having to work at it. President Obama alluded to that in his inaugural address today.

Bush is out of office now. You're just going to have to live with the fact that that's how I see him.

"If you were speaking respectfully, you wouldn't question my right to call myself an American." What a bigot. It is my right as an American to question you. It was not professional of you but the more I learn about you the more I find out underneath that suit how immature you really are. No one evaded more issues that Clinton yet that is someone who you seem to immortalize. I can live with him leaving and time will show that many of the policies he instituted helped this great country of ours.

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(Patriot)

"Aside from being a "bozo", I wonder if Paul will ever acknowledge that George W. Bush saved more lives than any other person in world history? This is not a fact that loony lefties , suffering from Bush Derangement Syndrome (BDS) will easily admit is true. Anyone that doubts the accuracy of this (Paul), should Google "President Bush's AIDS inititive". Bush is responsible for saving over 2 million lives in Sub-Saharan Africa and around the world by spending over 100 billion dollars on anti-viral AIDS drugs. Hardly the actions of a bozo. But let's not forget, Paul is a "Humanist"."

So Bush did one thing right and helped people in Africa. That's good. Now if only he hadn't destroyed the American economy and gotten us into an unnecessary war.

The usual spin.

We KNOW they are not saved because AIDS is incurable.

AIDS is fatal if not treated for life (and even then very often). Who will ensure that the "saved" individuals be treated for the rest of their lives? The very expensive medicine has to be made available to the "saved" until they die of old age or other causes not related to AIDS. No mean feat in areas with unstable governments.

Wishful thinking and political spin cannot override medical fact.

How many lives did Bush endanger and kill with his administrations abstinence only policies?

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Guest Guest
"If you were speaking respectfully, you wouldn't question my right to call myself an American." What a bigot. It is my right as an American to question you. It was not professional of you but the more I learn about you the more I find out underneath that suit how immature you really are. No one evaded more issues that Clinton yet that is someone who you seem to immortalize. I can live with him leaving and time will show that many of the policies he instituted helped this great country of ours.

You're an idiot. No one questioned your right. He just said it was disrespectful.

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Guest 2smart4u
The usual spin.

We KNOW they are not saved because AIDS is incurable.

AIDS is fatal if not treated for life (and even then very often). Who will ensure that the "saved" individuals be treated for the rest of their lives? The very expensive medicine has to be made available to the "saved" until they die of old age or other causes not related to AIDS. No mean feat in areas with unstable governments.

Wishful thinking and political spin cannot override medical fact.

How many lives did Bush endanger and kill with his administrations abstinence only policies?

Your ignorance is amusing.

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